Doctors need genuine Leave – painful barb for others @ Tokyo medical school


Japan medical school admits to altering scores to keep out female applicants

  Usually the kind of work of doctors keep them on toes and it is difficult to have leaves. This may be a global  phenomenon.  Medical systems also are not very comfortable with doctor’s leaves. Scarcity of doctors and difficult replacements makes life of doctors busy and unsocial.  Systematic  denial of genuine leave has been proved by  investigations  at   Tokyo medical school.

 

A Tokyo medical school has confirmed after an internal investigation that it systematically altered entrance exam scores for years to keep out female applicants and ensure more men became doctors. The school wanted fewer female doctors because it anticipated they would become mothers and would shorten or halt their careers. It is extremely important to improve the working environment so that women can pursue their medical professions. School’s purpose in denying women entry was because female doctors often quit working after starting families. Women tend to avoid tough jobs like surgery or work in remote areas. They need to take a break from their careers because of pregnancy and childbirth.

 Tokyo Medical University manipulated all entrance tests results since 2000 or even earlier. The findings released Tuesday by lawyers involved in the internal investigation confirm recent reports in Japanese media.

The manipulation surfaced during an investigation of an alleged wrongful admission of a bureaucrat’s son.

The internal investigation found the school first reduced all applicants’ first-stage scores to 80 percent then added up to 20 points only to male applicants with three or fewer application tries.

The school wanted fewer female doctors because it anticipated they would become mothers and would shorten or halt their careers.

Japan’s government urged a medical university to promptly disclose the results of an investigation into its admissions process Friday after reports alleged it had altered the test scores of female applicants for years to deny them entry and ensure fewer women became doctors.

The school’s public affairs department said it had no knowledge of the reported manipulation but is investigating. The school is already facing a separate scandal involving the inappropriate admission of a top education bureaucrat’s son and was ordered by the education ministry to investigate its admissions records for the past six years. On Thursday, the school said it will combine the examination of the score manipulation allegation with that probe.

The share of female doctors who have passed the national medical exam has stayed at around 30 percent for more than 20 years, prompting speculation that interference in admissions is widespread at Japanese medical schools.

The Japanese medical university’s alleged systematic deduction of entrance exam scores only from female applicants has sparked outrage across Japan. It was reported Thursday that Tokyo Medical University has been slashing female applicants’ entrance exam scores for years to keep female student population low, on grounds they tend to quit as doctors after starting families, causing staffing shortages

Admissions records released to The Associated Press by the school show the percentage of women who passed the entrance exam rose from 24 percent in 2009 to 38 percent in 2010. The figure has since stayed below that level until decreasing to 18 percent this year, when a total of 171 students passed the exam. The ratio of female applicants who were accepted this year was 2.9 percent, compared to 8.8 percent for men.

 

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