Ayurvedic Surgery: 10 Technical Questions? About safety concerns


      If there are certain doubts about the safety of the patient, the apprehension needs to be addressed.

      The government has issued a notification which authorises post-graduate practitioners in specified streams of Ayurveda to be trained to perform surgical procedures such as excisions of benign tumours, amputation of gangrene, nasal and cataract surgeries.

    The notification by the Central Council of Indian Medicine, a statutory body under the AYUSH Ministry to regulate the Indian systems of medicine, listed 39 general surgery procedures and around 19 procedures involving the eye, ear, nose and throat by amending the Indian Medicine Central Council (Post Graduate Ayurveda Education) Regulations, 2016.

     Any  Surgery, how-so-ever simple it may look to the people sitting on fence, carries some  risk and needs  some kind of precautions and regulations to make it risk free.  Therefore if there are certain doubts about the safety of the patient, the apprehension needs to be addressed. If the service of surgery by Ayurveda surgeon has to be availed by public, a certain confidence needs to be generated about the safety and quality assurance. Mere push by an enforced law will not lead to genesis of trust and confidence. So there needs to be technical analysis of some kind, whether  it is a genuine original  strategy or merely  an imposed law.

     If it was an accepted practice till now, there was no need for such notification. So apparently,  if the need was felt  to be said in a forceful manner, there has to be something unusual about the practice.

      No doubt, ancient Ayurvedic text referred to surgical practices. But  in present era of consumerism, patients need to know, how it was being practiced for last 200 to 300 years. What are the results and data about complications.

  There are two main categories for the purpose of discussion.

A. Existence of a robust system

B. Individual competencies.

    Firstly, there should be basic robust system  that will generate Ayurvedic surgeons.

To start with, the  CCIM need to  satisfy on following questions. Following are the basic requirements of surgery.

1. What  kind of Anaesthesia  will be used in surgeries by Ayurveda surgeons? Who will be the anaesthesiologist?

2. What are post op pain killers be used in surgeries by Ayurveda surgeons?

3. What antibiotics  will be  used;. Allopathic or ayurvedic?

4. What are principles of pre-op evaluation?

5. How surgical techniques are different. Are they same used in allopathic surgery or different ones described in Ayurveda?

6. How the post op complications are being managed. Is it by using allopathic medications and investigations?

7.  Data of surgeries done in last decade or two in all of  Ayurvedic medical colleges, especially those done by Ayurvedic surgeons.

8. Who is teaching Ayurveda doctors about the  surgeries? Are there ayurvedic teachers  or being taught by allopathic surgeons?

9. Will  the people in higher positions and government  officials be availing such facilities or it is only for the  poor people? 

10. Will the patients be given enough information or an informed consent about such Ayurvedic surgeons before  surgery?

         More than a law, the whole exercise   will require a trust building   in public  along with quality assurance and something unique to make such surgeries practically happen.

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

     REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

     21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

     Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

Covid-Warriors or Beggars: Doctors without pay


    Imagine a highly skilled professional community, which can be harassed, assaulted, dragged to courts and subjected to cruelty beyond imagination. Ironically, the despise to this community  comes from the  very people, whom they are trying to save.      

     Even the rightful is denied in a shameless manner, as if their lives don’t matter. During pandemic, doctor and nurses treated as dispensable disposables. A mere lip service to call them Covid-warriors  was performed, but real treatment  to these selfless health workers was akin to sacrificial lambs. 

    The plight of doctors of Hindu Rao Hospital is just an indication of the real thought process and apathy of administrators. If doctors are forced to beg for  basic fundamental rights, their situation is worse than beggars. The current unfortunate situation is enough to  convey  a message to the medical profession, the nation and is  demoralizing the entire doctor community, more so to the aspiring doctors.

Doctors at Hindu Rao Hospital unpaid for months

    Irked over non-payment of salaries, doctors and staff members of North Delhi Municipal Corporation’s Hindu Rao Hospital have decided to sit on indefinite agitation from Monday onwards. The emergency services will, however, operate smoothly.

The doctors and staff members of the hospitals have not been paid since June. Last week, the staffers were on a ‘Pen Down Strike’ from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. to display their ordeal. According to the civic body, the matter is being looked into.

The letter written by the Resident Doctor Association to the hospital administration stated, “We apologise to announce that we are forced to go for an indefinite agitation w.e.f. October 5, 2020 considering strictly ‘No pay, No work’, while operating the emergency services smoothly.”

It added, “The chronic sufferings of the staff have been too agonizing and intractable where it is distressing to one’s mental and physical well-being, We strongly plea to you for releasing 3 months’ pay and giving us an immediate permanent solution. We also demand a formal notice regarding the same.”

The association rued that despite the High Court Order and repetitive intimations in the past, the salaries of North MCD doctors and staff are long overdue for three months and its ongoing four months.

Besides Hindu Rao hospital, doctors and nurses of other hospitals like Maharishi Valmiki Infectious Diseases, Kasturba Hospital, Girdhari Lal Maternity Hospital and Rajan Babu Institute of Pulmonary Medicine and Tuberculosis have also been protesting over non-payment of dues.

   Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

   25 factors- why health care is expensive

   REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

   21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

   Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

#NEET: Paying Irrational Fee for Medical College Seat: An Unwise Idea


At a time when medical students and even doctors are uncertain whether opting for medical college along with the vulnerability and risk associated with   becoming a doctor is worth it or not, some are naive enough to pay millions as fee for medical education and for securing a seat of MBBS.

     A famous axiom “as you sow so shall you reap” has an application to health system. One is convinced that industry selling medical college seats has been quite powerful and practically, every technique to sell seats is prevalent to bypass the merit and deny seat to deserving candidates. These meritorious children, who are denied seats could have been   good doctors and   real custodian for the health of people.  But if for some reason, business prevails and government fails to prevent this cruel and corrupt selling of medical seats, an Einstein brain is not required to guess the whole malaise prevalent in health system

         Truth cannot remain hidden for long.  It has to be realized that getting into medical college is a minuscule component of the process of becoming a good doctor.  Once they opt for this profession, the real tough and prolonged battle begins. Quite a few successful candidates may eventually feel that the money spent and the hard work may not be worth it, especially those who may have invested in heavy fees and in debt.

   Although the whole effort and huge expenditure to become doctors in this way may be really worthless in today’s scenario, considering the difficult times and vulnerability of medical profession

Paying the irrational fee of medical colleges may be an unwise idea for the candidates, who are not from strong financial backgrounds. But at the same time unfortunately, it may be a compulsion and entrapment for students, who have entered the profession and there is no way forward or fail to get residency.

The government should regulate these fees and also ensure that if a heavy fee is charged, then it should be spent on medical education of students only. It should not take a form of just any another money minting industry to be used for other purposes.

        Going by selection criteria  of candidates as doctors, if given a choice, by whom a patient will like to get treated? A candidate who scored 20% – 30 % marks or a person getting 60% or 80% marks. NEET eligibility getting lower and  candidates getting around 30 % of marks  may be able to secure a degree to treat patients.  What will be the deciding factor? So in the end, seats remain unfilled and may be a kind of auction, whosoever can pay millions, takes the seat.

    Ironically, that strange equation is acceptable in lieu of money paid!

It is ironical that the medical profession is regulated, but medical business or medical education is not.  Such business of producing doctors based on their paying capacity should be clearly trounced for the benefit of public. Foundations of healthcare should be on touchstone of merit, ethics and character and not based on business deals.

       Therefore meritorious students, especially from average backgrounds, who opt to become doctors feel cheated when they pay massive fee to buy a seat. It is an insult to the very virtue of merit which should have been the sole criteria for these admissions.

     It is the people and society, who will be the real sufferers in future. Therefore resentment to such system should come from the society.  If the society continues to accept such below par practices, it has to introspect, whether it actually deserves to get good doctors.

   Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

   25 factors- why health care is expensive

   REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

   21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

   Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

MCI to NMC: Change of Medical Education Regulator


Some drastic regulation is need of the hour, of the  chaotic and non-uniform medical education system of India. Besides an urgent need for  better standards, uniformity in  standards of medical education and  fee structure is desirable. National Medical Commission Act 2019  has been passed. NMC has replaced MCI. But attainment of desired goals will still  depend upon, how well the future plans are implemented. The  mammoth system needs an herculean overall and honest policy changes from the roots.

The National Medical Commission (NMC), a new body, will function as the country’s top regulator of medical education from Friday, a day after the Centre dissolved the Board of Governors—Medical Council of India (BoG-MCI) through a gazette notification.

The setting up of NMC was a government move to bring reforms in the medical education sector, especially aimed at replacing the MCI, which was tainted by corruption.

The government had dissolved the MCI in 2018 following the corruption charges and replaced it with a BoG, which was chaired by Dr VK Paul, member (health), Niti Aayog.

The body was functioning under the Indian Medical Council (IMC) Act, 1956.

“The BoG-MCI has been dissolved and the NMC replaced it with effect from Friday,” said Dr Paul.

The IMC Act stands repealed, and has been replaced by The NMC Act that came into existence on August 8, 2019.

“Indian Medical Council Act, 1956 (102 of 1956) is hereby repealed with effect from September 25. The BoG appointed under section 3A of the Indian Medical Council Act, 1956 (102 of 1956) in supersession of the MCI constituted under sub-section (1) of section 3 of the said Act shall stand dissolved,” stated the gazette notification issued by the Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoH&FW).

Professor Suresh Chandra Sharma, former head of the ear nose throat (ENT) department at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, has been appointed as the chairman of the NMC.

Dr Sharma had retired from AIIMS in January and was selected by a seven-member search committee for the post from 300-odd applications received from across the country. He was also one of the five short-listed candidates for the post of director, AIIMS, New Delhi, after the then director, Dr MC Misra, had retired in 2017.

Dr Rakesh Kumar Vats, secretary general, BoG-MCI, has been appointed as the secretary of the NMC by the Appointments Committee of Cabinet (ACC).

The NMC will have four separate autonomous boards: under-graduate medical education, post-graduate medical education, medical assessment and rating and ethics and medical registration.

The common final year Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) examination will now be known as the National Exit Test (NEXT), according to the new medical education structure under the NMC.

NEXT will act as licentiate examination to practice medicine, the criteria for admission to post-graduate (PG) medical courses, and also for screening of foreign medical graduates.

Besides, the National Eligibility and Entrance Test (NEET), NEXT will also be applicable to institutes of national importance such as all the AIIMS in a bid to ensure a common standard in the medical education sector in the country.

Expensive medical college seat: is it worth?

What fuels a doctor?


You have to live a doctor’s life or to very closely watch one’s to understand it.

As a young overburdened doctor, still undergoing the rigours of academics, I used to commit certain silly mistakes of commission and omission which my watchful patients and their attendants would easily catch. And they would gladly discount it or let me know not grudgingly. From a twenty year old boy to a fifty plus oldie – that has kept me going.

It is hard getting into medicine. Equally hard studying it and even harder practising it. The litmus test was declaring a patient dead. Even harder , declaring a neonate dead with its face beautified by the large dead pupils. As if it is going to cry just ! It takes quite some heart to do the ultimate job of declaring the undeclarable. And then you come across patients and people your age who tell you they get all sorts of symptoms upon hearing someone die !!

Doctors live fast, age fast and studies have confirmed, they die faster than the general population. Their youth is almost completely absorbed by the vast study material and rigours of one of the most difficult courses.

Once as a house physician, I encountered a school girl with fever admitted in my ward. As a routine I used to check the vitals of around 30 patients morning and evening before the rounds. She used to laugh at me saying that I had nothing better to do than a nurses’ job. It took us almost a week to diagnose her with a blood cancer. She happened to be a cousin of one of my friends. She lost her hair to chemo drugs. Tired of the disease and confines of the hospital, one evening she insisted to go out.  She was so insistent that her mother requested me if I could take her from the hospital to my room. I refused to oblige her under a veil of principles and legality. After the whole night of  confusion, whether to accede to what may be one wish in her last days, I decided to take her out of ward. I prepared  myself  for a reprimand, I would face in the department. Next morning when I reported for duty , her bed was empty. She had massive bleed at night. I cried. That was about 25 years back. I still cry though very sparingly now, on losing a patient.

Only a doctor would understand this.

Looking back , it is not money , it is not anything but a glint of gratefulness in the eyes of my patients and it is the tolerance of my patients to my mistakes that has kept me going all these years. But that desired emotions are lacking somewhere and myself, at times do not feel the zeal  to continue anymore.

  A sense of gratitude in the  eyes of patients that fueled the doctor inside me,  is no more visible now.

Dr Sandeep Chaudhri

Consultant Internal medicine, Karnal (Haryana)

Doctor & nurses at risk from unknown or mutated germs@ Mystery virus in China


 

First pneumonia death from mystery virus in China, world on high alert

          The  viruses, bacteria are germs  had been discovered only in last one century and many more are still not known. Patients carrying specially unknown germs are  handled by doctor and nurses, who have no clue, what they are dealing with.   Time gap in such  patients coming to the  hospital  and  the exact diagnosis of finding a dreaded disease, may be  quite dangerous to doctors and nurses. To add to the problem, In  large number of patients, exact viruses cannot be diagnosed or even suspected. In many cases of ARDS, the causative organism cannot be  isolated or identified.  It is important for  doctors and nurses  to take universal precautions from the beginning. There can be many more viruses or germs which are yet to be discovered or mutated ones that  are unknown.

21 occupational risk to doctor and nurses

H1N1, Zika,  Ebola,  SARS  are few examples,  just to imagine that they existed and handled by health workers as unknown germs, till they were discovered.

The death of a 61-year-old man  due to pneumonia from a mystery virus in the central Chinese city of Wuhan on Saturday has put the world on high alert against another new life-threatening illness. Seven of the 43 others diagnosed with the disease are in a critical condition, but no new cases have been reported since January 3.

To protect the world still smarting from the lightning spread of devastating viral diseases such as H1N1, Zika and Ebola, the World Health Organisation (WHO) issued this year’s first  international travel and trade alert on  on January 10 that advised all international travellers to report symptoms of fever with breathlessness and difficulty breathing, especially if they have travelled from China.

On January 9, China announced that the cluster of pneumonia cases reported in December in Wuhan in the Hubei Province of China was caused by a new coronavirus.

Only six viruses from the coronavirus family infect humans, which would make the new one the seventh to cause human disease. The coronavirus viruses cause diseases ranging from the common cold to very severe and life-threatening illness from Middle-East Respiratory Syndrome that caused 851 deaths since it was identified in 2012, and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), which killed 774 of the 8,098 people infected in an outbreak that started in China in 2002.

“Though currently there is no evidence of human-to-human transmission, we need to remain vigilant. WHO has shared with all Member States technical guidelines on surveillance, testing as well as infection prevention and control practices for suspected cases. WHO is in close contact with national authorities in the region and will extend all possible support to ensure core capacities are geared up for addressing potential cases that may come to countries,” said Dr Poonam Khetrapal Singh, WHO regional director, South East Asia Region.

Unknown threat

Some countries in the region, including Indonesia, Myanmar and Thailand, have started screening passengers travelling from China for pneumonia symptoms at airports. The health ministry reviewed the situation with WHO experts on Wednesday and plans to start providing travellers with risk-reduction information at airports and other ports of entry, travel agencies and conveyance operators.

“We are waiting and watching as entry screening at ports of entry like airports, seaports, train stations and border check-posts are not cost-effective. It is resource-intensive but offer little benefit,” said a health ministry official, who did not want to be named.

Though no pneumonia have been reported outside Wuhan, which has a population of 11 million, WHO said there is need for caution as the city is a major domestic and international transport hub with heavy population movement. Travel in the region is expected to significantly increase during the Chinese New Year in the last week of January, which increases the potential of infected travellers carrying to other parts of China and the world.

New viruses are formed when mutate to jump species and cause infection in humans. SARS jumped from the civet cat into humans, MERS from dromedary camel, H1N1 from pigs, and Ebola from bats, just to name a few.

The Wuhan City cases have been linked to the South China Seafood Wholesale Market, where some of the patients worked as dealers or vendors. The Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market deals with fish and other seafood, including sea mammals, along with chicken, bats, rabbits and snakes.

Signs of trouble; The clinical signs of the new lung infection are mainly fever, with a few persons reporting difficulty in breathing. Clinical signs include chest x-rays showing bilateral lung infiltrates (markings) associated with pneumonia and tuberculosis.

With no infection among health care workers treating the patients, preliminary information suggests there is no significant human-to-human transmission, but till the mode of transmission is clearly established, it’s best to take precautions to stay safe.

The WHO advises people travelling in or from affected areas (currently Wuhan) to avoid close contact with people with acute respiratory infections; wash hands frequently, especially after direct contact with ill people or their environment; and avoid close contact with live or dead animals. In case of respiratory symptoms before, during or after travel, travellers must seek medical attention and share their travel history with the doctor.

“The WHO advises against travel or trade restrictions on China based on the information currently available on this event,” said Dr Singh.

 

 

How to implement bridge course, if necessary: A suggestion #NMC


Crosspathy is dangerous to human race and potential global catastrophe because of antibiotic resistance.  All  allopathic medicines are hazardous chemicals in inexperienced hands. Incorrect and massive use of antibiotics will  cause antibiotic resistance, which has global ramifications. From this angle, it is a retrograde step. When all over the world, need is being felt that there has to be better control of antibiotic prescription.  We are entering an era, where antibiotics are getting useless and more so because of rampant misuse of antibiotics.  Rather than exercising a better control, it will be a catastrophic to human race world over by causing antibiotic resistance.

Will  thousands or lac   of alternate medicine graduate will dispense all antibiotics,  anticancer , anti diabetic , cardiac medications? It is hard to think about hundreds of potentially dangerous medicines being given without structured training and  proper exams in this system of crosspathy.

   Although it appears to be an avoidable decision, but still if required can be done by creating “doctors for area of need.

Following steps should be taken before implementation:

 Main Aim; to create doctors  for area of need. (AON doctor)

  1. To identify areas of need; most basic step is to identify the areas of need, where doctors are not available. Government should identify area of need and implement the scheme in selected areas, and with  selected simple drugs. Such areas should be such that which do not have medical facilities or lack doctors. Areas which already have doctors will not accept the diluted  or sub-optimal care, for example urban population.
  2. Limited seats-To identify the number required; let us say start with pilot project of  selecting 500 to1000 such doctors. All the lakhs of alternate doctors  can not be allowed to prescribe allopathic medicines. It will put the community at risk.

Each and every seat of AON and its doctor needs to be identified , earmarked and  trained for the particular seat.

  1. To identify the skills required for the area; for example emergency, for paediatrics or obstretics and gynaecology, trauma.
  2. Willingness to work in area of need- to identify the doctors: have a written competition from all candidates who apply for bridge course. To identify doctors who have given willingness to work in these areas of need. People who perform well should be taken for bridge course  only on limited seats. Bridge course should not  free for all.
  3. To develop a structured bridge course, which should be around one year after comparing the course of MBBS and the course done by the candidate.
  4. Admission and exit in the bridge course should be through exam and limited seats.
  5. Bridge course and allopathic medicines should not be made free for all, that any body can dispense it. We can get benefit only if is specific to needs of people. If everyone is allowed to practice allopathy in all locality, it will be a global hazard besides our community .
  6. These trained doctors will have an undertaking to serve in area of need only. For a period at least 10 to 20 years.
  7. Number should be limited but training should be good.
  8. A special course needs to be designed separately for one year, so that people in area of need do not get substandard care

Without proper planning and implementation and identification of area of need, this bridge course will not benefit anyone, rather it can be disastrous.

 

Reasons of having excessive thirst:


If some ones  feels  the need to   drink lots of water, most of time  reason is usually  known . For example,   not  drinking enough of it. But some times there can be more sinister mechanisms and need evaluation. There can be number of diseases,  which can  present  by  excessive thirst.   This derangement is  more  other than merely being dehydrated.

If drinking more fluids for several days hasn’t helped, there can be reasons other than dehydration.

Dehydration:

If some ones  feels  the need to   drink lots of water, most of time  reason is usually  known . For example,   not  drinking enough of it. Dehydration occurs if some one  does really hard work  in the ground or  sweating in the sun. The loss of fluids need to be replenished .

Dehydration commonly happens, in cases of food poisoning ,  diarrhoea, vomiting, inability to eat or drink  and loose motions.

Diabetes

One of the most important symptom of diabetes is thirst.  All types of  diabetes will present as increased intake of water and being thirsty.  Frequent urination, another common symptom of diabetes, will bring on thirst.   Therefore  excessive thirst and urination, along with unexplained weight loss, fatigue, or irritability, can be indications of diabetes.

Dry mouth

The abnormal dryness of the mucous membranes in the mouth, due to decreased  flow or change in the composition of saliva.  It is  also known as xerostomia, is often mistaken for excessive thirst.  Causes of dry mouth include smoking tobacco, use of  marijuana, stress, anxiety, or  aging.  But certain drugs (antidepressants) and autoimmune diseases can also cause dry mouth.

One  may think  being thirsty, whereas  actual reason is  having a dry mouth.

Dry mouth can present as :

  • a burning sensation or soreness in your mouth
  • changes in your sense of taste
  • difficulty speaking, eating or swallowing.

Menstrual blood loss

Estrogen and progesterone levels can both affect fluid volume.  If blood flow is more, it can  also cause  more  blood loss.   The blood loss will cause increase in thirst.

 

Thyroid problems

When the thyroid function is deranged , hormone  production is erratic can,  produce increased  or less e hormone. Thyroid dysfunction can   spur a variety of nonspecific symptoms, including abnormally heavy periods, anxiety, feeling hot, and dry mouth. These all can lead to increased thirst.

 Stress

Stress or specially chronic  stress is a cause for  adrenal gland dysfunction specially if  stress is severe.  This can cause dizziness,  depression, anxiety, and  severe  thirst.

 

Diuretic  and food containing diuretics:

    Drugs that produce lot of urine  are diuretics. They  can cause feeling of thirst.

Foods that have a diuretic effect can make you thirsty because they cause you to urinate more. Foods like melons,  ginger, celery, asparagus, beets, lemons.

 

Low-carbohydrate  diets:

        One of  side effect of Keto- diet  is thirst. The eating plan  significantly cuts down on  carbohydrate intake.   Carbohydrates s absorb  more water than protein and fat.

 

Pregnancy:

excessive thirst can happen in pregnancy due to many reasons for example  Increased urination,  nausea and morning sickness

Excessive bleeding:

Ongoing or sudden blood loss,   can  cause  thirst levels  in order to  make up for the fluid loss.

 

Diabetes insipidus:

Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder that affects water absorption.   It can cause loss of huge  amounts of water  by production of litres of urine.   Cause can be brain or kidney called as central and nephrogenic respectively.

Psychogenic  polydipsia:  this is an urge to drink more water and  patients are unable to control the urge.  Patients may have intake of many litres per day.

 

 

“EDG scale of doctor’s comfort: guide for medical students” – How to choose medical specialty


Choosing a medical specialty is possibly one of the most important variable factor in doctor’s life. This one factor will decide the rest of the  life of the doctor. General rough guide to the factors involved, which persist forever and throughout the life, after a doctor chooses a specialty is given below. There can be individual variation depending upon the individual attitudes, compromises and way to do practice. Therefore there will be some variation in all the fields for individuals, places, systems and countries.

Re-blog

There can be extremes and variations  on either side of spectrum, but are exceptions. Following article does not include satisfaction and earning gained from   other businesses done by doctors, running nursing home or hospitals, commercial gains  from pharmaceuticals etc. this is on basis of income purely from professional work of treating patients.  These  factors and units can be used as a scale for guidance of medical students and hence named as EDG scale of doctor’s comfort (Extinct doctor good)

Factors

  1.      Earning
  2.      Prolonged tough training
  3.      Satisfaction of treating patients
  4.      Satisfaction of making diagnosis
  5.      Emergency & odd hour duty
  6.       Stress of life and death
  7.       Legal complexity and stress

The Unit—-Single * or (I) is  one unit. With experience and years of work , this unit  (for same doctor) will also multiply with age.

UNIT

India ( * or 1) is  1  million  rupees/annum

Advanced countries- (* or 1)== one lac or 100,000 dollars/ annum

 

General practice

 

 
       1.  Earning **to ***      2-3
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**
Internal medicine

 

 
       1.  Earning **to****        2-4
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**to***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***

 

cardiology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*******  2-7
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****

 

gastroenterology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******   2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

***
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**

 

Neurology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******  2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

****
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***                  3

 

Nephrology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******   2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

***
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***           3

 

Pulmonary medicine

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****     2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

***
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***                    3

 

 

Emergency  Medicine

 

 
       1.  Earning **to****     2-4
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

****
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****                4

 

Anaesthesia

 

 
       1.    Earning **to*****     2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

**
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****                 4
Endocrinology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****       2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                2
Psychiatry

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****       2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                  2

 

 

 

 

paediatrics

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****       2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

***
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****                  4

 

Critical care

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****   2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

****
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****           4

 

Paediatric critical care

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****     2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****               4

 

General Surgery

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****      2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****               4

 

Minimal access surgery

 

 
1.          Earning **to******    2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

***
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***                3

 

 

Cardiac surgery- CTVS

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******    2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****               4

 

Urology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******    2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***                 3

 

Gastro-surgery

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******    2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****            4

 

Neurosurgery

 

 
       1.  Earning   **to******   2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****            4

 

Head and Neck surgery

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******   2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***               3

 

Orthopaedics

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******                2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***                             3

 

Ophthalmology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****             2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                           2

 

Radiology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******   2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

*
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

****
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                  2
ENT

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****    2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                 2

 

Dermatology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****   2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

*
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

*                1

 

Gynaecology/obstetrics

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****   2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****

 

Plastic Surgery

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******    2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

*
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**              2

 

 

Oncology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****   2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**               2

 

Onco-surgery

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******     2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                    2

 

Anatomy

 

 
       1.  Earning **to***     2-3
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

Nil
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

Nil
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

Nil
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

Nil

 

Physiology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to***
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

Nil
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

Nil
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

Nil
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

Nil

 

Biochemistry

 

 
       1.  Earning **to***    2-3
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

Nil
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

Nil
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

Nil
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

Nil

 

Microbiology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to****    2-4
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

0 to*
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

*
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

*

 

 

Pathology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to ****    2-4
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

NIl
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

****
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

*
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

*

 

Medical administrator/Manager

 

 
       1.  Earning **to********  2-8

sometimes multiple

       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

Nil
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

Nil
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

*
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

*

. There can be extremes and variations  on either side of spectrum, but are exceptions.

If the reader have some different view, or want to add something, they are welcome to  write in comments. This table just  highlights a trend of factors and may not be perfect. But it gives the factors which need to be taken into account,  before choosing specialty.

How to choose medical specialty? Variation of doctor salary, earning & important factors


Choosing a medical specialty is possibly one of the most important variable factor in doctor’s life. This one factor will decide the rest of the  life of the doctor. General rough guide to the factors involved, which persist forever and throughout the life, after a doctor chooses a specialty is given below. There can be individual variation depending upon the individual attitudes, compromises and way to do practice. Therefore there will be some variation in all the fields for individuals, places, systems and countries.

There can be extremes and variations  on either side of spectrum, but are exceptions. Following article does not include satisfaction and earning gained from   other businesses done by doctors, running nursing home or hospitals, commercial gains  from pharmaceuticals etc. this is on basis of income purely from professional work of treating patients.

Factors

  1.      Earning
  2.      Prolonged tough training
  3.      Satisfaction of treating patients
  4.      Satisfaction of making diagnosis
  5.      Emergency & odd hour duty
  6.      Stress of life and death
  7.      Legal complexity and stress

The Unit—-Single * or (I) is  one unit. With experience and years of work , this unit  (for same doctor) will also multiply with age.

UNIT

India ( * or 1) is  1  million  rupees/annum

Advanced countries- (* or 1)== one lac or 100,000 dollars/ annum

 

General practice

 

 
       1.  Earning **to ***      2-3
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**
Internal medicine

 

 
       1.  Earning **to****        2-4
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**to***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***

 

cardiology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*******  2-7
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****

 

gastroenterology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******   2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

***
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**

 

Neurology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******  2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

****
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***                  3

 

Nephrology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******   2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

***
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***           3

 

Pulmonary medicine

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****     2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

***
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***                    3

 

 

Emergency  Medicine

 

 
       1.  Earning **to****     2-4
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

****
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****                4

 

Anaesthesia

 

 
       1.    Earning **to*****     2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

**
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****                 4
Endocrinology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****       2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                2
Psychiatry

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****       2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                  2

 

paediatrics

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****       2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

***
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****                  4

 

Critical care

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****   2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

****
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****           4

 

Paediatric critical care

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****     2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****               4

 

General Surgery

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****      2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****               4

 

Minimal access surgery

 

 
1.          Earning **to******    2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

***
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***                3

 

 

Cardiac surgery- CTVS

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******    2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****               4

 

Urology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******    2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***                 3

 

Gastro-surgery

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******    2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****            4

 

Neurosurgery

 

 
       1.  Earning   **to******   2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

****
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****            4

 

Head and Neck surgery

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******   2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***               3

 

Orthopaedics

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******                2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

***
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

***                             3

 

Ophthalmology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****             2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                           2

 

Radiology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******   2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

*
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

****
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                  2
ENT

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****    2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                 2

 

Dermatology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****   2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

*
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

*                1

 

Gynaecology/obstetrics

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****   2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

****
       6. Stress of life and death

 

****
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

****

 

Plastic Surgery

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******    2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

*
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

*
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**              2

 

 

Oncology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to*****   2-5
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

***
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**               2

 

Onco-surgery

 

 
       1.  Earning **to******     2-6
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

***
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

***
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

**
       6. Stress of life and death

 

**
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

**                    2

 

Anatomy

 

 
       1.  Earning **to***     2-3
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

Nil
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

Nil
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

Nil
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

Nil

 

Physiology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to***
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

Nil
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

Nil
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

Nil
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

Nil

 

Biochemistry

 

 
       1.  Earning **to***    2-3
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

Nil
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

Nil
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

Nil
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

Nil

 

Microbiology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to****    2-4
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

0 to*
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

**
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

*
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

*

 

 

Pathology

 

 
       1.  Earning **to ****    2-4
       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

NIl
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

****
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

*
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

*

 

Medical administrator/Manager

 

 
       1.  Earning **to********  2-8

sometimes multiple

       2..   Prolonged tough training

 

**
       3..   Satisfaction of treating patients

 

Nil
       4.  Satisfaction of making diagnosis

 

Nil
       5. Emergency & odd hour duty

 

*
       6. Stress of life and death

 

Nil
      7. Legal complexity and stress

 

*

 

. There can be extremes and variations  on either side of spectrum, but are exceptions.

If the reader have some different view, or want to add something, they are welcome to  write in comments. This table just  highlights a trend of factors and may not be perfect. But it gives the factors which need to be taken into account,  before choosing specialty.

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