Human-to-human transmission of China Corona virus # symptoms # doctor, nurses


Symptoms: including fever, coughs, breathing difficulties and pneumonia.

Coronaviruses are transmitted between animals and people, and the outbreak in Wuhan has been linked to a now-closed seafood market where live animals were reportedly sold. Preventive measures were also being taken to protect doctors and health care workers.

Patients carrying specially unknown germs are handled by doctor and nurses, who have no clue, what they are dealing with. Time gap in such patients coming to the hospital and the exact diagnosis of finding a dreaded disease, may be quite dangerous to doctors and nurses.To add to the problem, In large number of patients, exact viruses cannot be diagnosed or even suspected. In many cases of ARDS, the causative organism cannot be isolated or identified. It is important for doctors and nurses to take universal precautions at every level. There can be many more viruses or germs which are yet to be discovered or mutated ones that are unknown.

H1N1, Zika, Ebola, SARS are few examples, just to imagine that they existed and handled by health workers as unknown germs, till they were discovered.

China’s National Health Commission has confirmed human-to-human transmissionof a mysterious Sars-like virus that has spread across the country and fueled anxiety about the prospect of a major outbreak as millions begin travelling for lunar new year celebrations.

Zhong Nanshan, a respiratory expert and head of the health commission team investigating the outbreak, confirmed that two cases of infection in China’s Guangdong province had been caused by human-to-human transmission and medical staff had been infected, China’s official Xinhua news agency said on Monday.

Authorities earlier reported 139 new cases of the new strain of coronavirus over the weekend, bringing the total number of infected patients to 217 since the virus was first detected last month in the central city of Wuhan.

Cases were confirmed in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangdong province in the south, heightening fears ahead of the lunar new year holiday, when more than 400 million people are expected to travel domestically and internationally.

State broadcaster CCTV said on Monday evening there were seven suspected cases in other parts of the country, including Shandong in the east, and the south-western provinces of Sichuan, Guangxi and Yunnan. Five people who travelled from Wuhan were also being treated for fevers in Zhejiang province.

“People’s lives and health should be given top priority and the spread of the outbreak should be resolutely curbed,” said China’s president, Xi Jinping, weighing in on the matter for the first time.

The strain has caused alarm because of its connection to severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars), which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-03. Three people have so far died in the current outbreak, which has spread to Thailand, Japan and South Korea.

The World Health Organization has said an animal source was “the most likely primary source” of the outbreak, with “some limited human-to-human transmission occurring between close contacts”. Researchers worry the number of infections has been severely underestimated.

21 occupational risk to health workers

Doctor & nurses at risk from unknown or mutated germs@ Mystery virus in China


 

First pneumonia death from mystery virus in China, world on high alert

          The  viruses, bacteria are germs  had been discovered only in last one century and many more are still not known. Patients carrying specially unknown germs are  handled by doctor and nurses, who have no clue, what they are dealing with.   Time gap in such  patients coming to the  hospital  and  the exact diagnosis of finding a dreaded disease, may be  quite dangerous to doctors and nurses. To add to the problem, In  large number of patients, exact viruses cannot be diagnosed or even suspected. In many cases of ARDS, the causative organism cannot be  isolated or identified.  It is important for  doctors and nurses  to take universal precautions from the beginning. There can be many more viruses or germs which are yet to be discovered or mutated ones that  are unknown.

21 occupational risk to doctor and nurses

H1N1, Zika,  Ebola,  SARS  are few examples,  just to imagine that they existed and handled by health workers as unknown germs, till they were discovered.

The death of a 61-year-old man  due to pneumonia from a mystery virus in the central Chinese city of Wuhan on Saturday has put the world on high alert against another new life-threatening illness. Seven of the 43 others diagnosed with the disease are in a critical condition, but no new cases have been reported since January 3.

To protect the world still smarting from the lightning spread of devastating viral diseases such as H1N1, Zika and Ebola, the World Health Organisation (WHO) issued this year’s first  international travel and trade alert on  on January 10 that advised all international travellers to report symptoms of fever with breathlessness and difficulty breathing, especially if they have travelled from China.

On January 9, China announced that the cluster of pneumonia cases reported in December in Wuhan in the Hubei Province of China was caused by a new coronavirus.

Only six viruses from the coronavirus family infect humans, which would make the new one the seventh to cause human disease. The coronavirus viruses cause diseases ranging from the common cold to very severe and life-threatening illness from Middle-East Respiratory Syndrome that caused 851 deaths since it was identified in 2012, and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), which killed 774 of the 8,098 people infected in an outbreak that started in China in 2002.

“Though currently there is no evidence of human-to-human transmission, we need to remain vigilant. WHO has shared with all Member States technical guidelines on surveillance, testing as well as infection prevention and control practices for suspected cases. WHO is in close contact with national authorities in the region and will extend all possible support to ensure core capacities are geared up for addressing potential cases that may come to countries,” said Dr Poonam Khetrapal Singh, WHO regional director, South East Asia Region.

Unknown threat

Some countries in the region, including Indonesia, Myanmar and Thailand, have started screening passengers travelling from China for pneumonia symptoms at airports. The health ministry reviewed the situation with WHO experts on Wednesday and plans to start providing travellers with risk-reduction information at airports and other ports of entry, travel agencies and conveyance operators.

“We are waiting and watching as entry screening at ports of entry like airports, seaports, train stations and border check-posts are not cost-effective. It is resource-intensive but offer little benefit,” said a health ministry official, who did not want to be named.

Though no pneumonia have been reported outside Wuhan, which has a population of 11 million, WHO said there is need for caution as the city is a major domestic and international transport hub with heavy population movement. Travel in the region is expected to significantly increase during the Chinese New Year in the last week of January, which increases the potential of infected travellers carrying to other parts of China and the world.

New viruses are formed when mutate to jump species and cause infection in humans. SARS jumped from the civet cat into humans, MERS from dromedary camel, H1N1 from pigs, and Ebola from bats, just to name a few.

The Wuhan City cases have been linked to the South China Seafood Wholesale Market, where some of the patients worked as dealers or vendors. The Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market deals with fish and other seafood, including sea mammals, along with chicken, bats, rabbits and snakes.

Signs of trouble; The clinical signs of the new lung infection are mainly fever, with a few persons reporting difficulty in breathing. Clinical signs include chest x-rays showing bilateral lung infiltrates (markings) associated with pneumonia and tuberculosis.

With no infection among health care workers treating the patients, preliminary information suggests there is no significant human-to-human transmission, but till the mode of transmission is clearly established, it’s best to take precautions to stay safe.

The WHO advises people travelling in or from affected areas (currently Wuhan) to avoid close contact with people with acute respiratory infections; wash hands frequently, especially after direct contact with ill people or their environment; and avoid close contact with live or dead animals. In case of respiratory symptoms before, during or after travel, travellers must seek medical attention and share their travel history with the doctor.

“The WHO advises against travel or trade restrictions on China based on the information currently available on this event,” said Dr Singh.

 

 

Healthcare system a sinking ship: Says Niti Aayog


A chaotic and non-uniform system, after years of neglect cannot be corrected overnight or by change in piecemeal policies. It needs to be revamped from the roots. To do it from grass root  level especially with financial constraints,  it will need a  sincere will to develop  the system.

                     India’s top think tank said Thursday that the country’s healthcare system resembled a “sinking ship”and desperately needs more private participation in smaller towns to run the government’s ambitious Ayushman Bharat program efficiently.

“We would require all hands on deck, as they say,” Niti Aayog adviser Alok Kumar said at the Healthcare Federation of India’s Sixth Annual Summit, referring to the poor state of healthcare in India. The Ayushman Bharat’s insurance program, Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana (PMJAY), has been facing constraints in smaller cities due to a dearth of hospitals.

“We can’t have all the patients being transported to tier-1 and tier-2 cities for treatment because that is not a model which is sustainable,” Kumar said.

The Lancet, the world’s oldest and most prestigious journal, had last year ranked India’s healthcare system at a dismal 145 out of 195 countries, worse than even North Korea and Syria. The ranking was worse than its smaller Asian peer Philippines and neighbour Sri Lanka, a fact also pointed by Kumar.

Kumar said that a number of hospitals in smaller cities, including those run by public sector enterprises, are under-utilized even though there is strong demand for their services in these regions, especially because of the insurance program.

“Singrauli, for instance, the power capital of India, has hospitals of NTPC, Coal India Ltd; all of them underutilized (like) shells standing. Railway hospitals (are like) shells standing but not being utilized efficiently enough,” Kumar said.

He urged large private hospital chains to manage the hospitals run by state enterprises better by widening the scope of their services to beyond their own employees.

The PMJAY was introduced last year, and aims to provide health insurance cover of 5 lakhs per family per year for secondary and tertiary care hospitalization to over 10 crore poor and vulnerable families, which would total around 50 crore beneficiaries.

Ayushman Bharat is the umbrella program, with PMJAY for secondary and tertiary hospitalization, and health and wellness centres for primary healthcare facilities. Under the Ayushman Bharat, the government aims to create around 1.5 lakh health and wellness centres.

While the Indian government aims to increase the share of public health spending to 2.5% of GDP by 2025 under the National Health Policy, currently it is still only around 1%.

Another major problem for the poor state of the sector is the lack of health insurance for patients, leading to an out of pocket expenditure making up for 61% of total health expenses for households, as of 2015-16, latest National Health Accounts data showed.

To reduce out of pocket expenses, the government introduced the Ayushman Bharat insurance scheme, but large private hospital chains have shown resistance to participating in it due to ‘low package rates’ for various treatment procedures. Kumar said that the government was willing to listen to hospitals and other private entities and make changes to policy if they were ready to invest in the sector.

 

Risk to health workers working in remote areas (specially-Women; Doctors & Nurses)


 

Often  an issue is raised that doctors and nurses  are hesitant to go to  remote places.  Brutal rape and murder of Hyderabad vet doctor  is an evidence of the  dangers lurking because of  preying eyes   and lack of security, specially to women health workers (doctors and nurses).

 A  ghastly  incident that highlights the dangers associated with entering unfamiliar places, unsecured environment  and a dark world with  no one to listen to   heart wrenching cries of the unassuming victim. With no serious policing activities, it may turn out to be unthinkable nightmare.

       But  the lady doctor  went  to a place where transport was difficult and paid the price. A  women  is being  posted to an area where transport and security  were not provided and thereby  assigned  an unsafe posting.

         Doctor   should consider these factors before joining at unsafe places.

          Problem is that the system does not take into account the risk to health workers, their convenience  and  family obligations. Their difficulty in transport,  the security issues, providing basic amenities are  not considered important by  administrators.

  The system  that failed to  provide proper transport and security is the  real culprit.

 Till  some one  puts a question to  the  system and makes them accountable, there will be  more cases of this kind.

  Had  the  deceased  not been  a doctor, or from  some  other profession,  there was no compulsion  for her to go to remote areas.

        Lack of medical facilities  and infrastructure add to the  risk, as the health workers are held responsible for  all the short comings. Not infrequently they become the punching bags for the  inept system and infra structure deficiencies.     Females doctors and nurses are at greater  risk for obvious reasons and strangely there are no special provisions made for their security. Usually they are allotted a place where  they have to fend for themselves.  If one thinks it seriously, risk is even  greater than anticipated.

   Women -Doctors & Nurses- need to take precautions and save themselves in view of system insensitivity.

 

21  occupational-risk factors – for doctor and nurses

Real story of female doctor assault- serving uncivilized society

Work life balance problem for female doctor and nurses

Disadvantage of being a doctor

Who killed Hyderabad  Vet Doctor? Answer : “OUR SYSTEM”


 

      A vet doctor  was subjected to   brutal rape and death in Hyderabad.  An incident that filled  our hearts with  grief  and  pain.

Who are culprits? The four men, caught and will be given punishment. But are they alone the culprits?

       No; there are culprits who will not be even named. Our system is the biggest culprit.             

 Often  an issue is raised that doctors do not go to  remote places.

 But  the lady doctor  went  to a place where transport was difficult and paid the price. A female is posted to an area where transport and security  were not provided. She was given an unsafe posting with no security  and no transport.   The person who gave her  such posting is also the  culprit

         The system  that failed to  provide proper transport and security is the  real culprit. Till  some one  puts a question to  the  system and makes them accountable, there will be  more cases of this kind.

        May  the departed soul rest in peace. 

       Doctor   should consider these factors before joining at unsafe places.

 

 female  doctor  assault ; serving uncivilized society

Young veterinarian murdered, set on fire near Hyderabad after her vehicle broke down

The victim, who had left her house in Shadnagar for Kolluru village to attend her duties at a veterinary hospital, called her sister on Wednesday night to inform that her two-wheeler had broken down while returning home.

A young veterinarian has been murdered by unknown persons, while her burnt body was found on Thursday in Shadnagar town close to the Telangana state capital, police said.The charred body of the victim was found at Chatanpally bridge near Shadnagar town in the Ranga Reddy district.The victim, who had left her house in Shadnagar for Kolluru village to attend her duties at a veterinary hospital, called her sister on Wednesday night to inform that her two-wheeler had broken down while returning home.She told her sister that she was feeling scared and that somebody had offered to help her and taken her vehicle for repair. When her family members tried to contact her later, her mobile phone was found to be switched off.Police said the charred body of a female, aged between 20-25 years, was found near the bridge. Sridhar Reddy identified victim’s body as being that of his daughter.Senior police officers rushed to the scene for launching their investigations and were scanning CCTV footage from a nearby toll gate for clues.It may be recalled that in another gruesome incident earlier this month in the same district a man burnt alive a woman revenue official inside her office near here, but in the process also suffered critical burn injuries himself. The shocking incident occurred in the Abdullapurmet Tahsil Office in Ranga Reddy district on the outskirts of Hyderabad.

 

 

 

Black coat vs white coat: medical profession vs law industry


Every medical  case that goes to court involves lawyers and their expensive fees. Most of the time even though the doctors may be right, he has to defend himself with the help of  lawyers.  Law industry has been  benefited enormously because of consumer protection act at the cost of doctors. Increasing mistrust and unhappiness in patient’s mind definitely does not  help patients and doctors, but ends up benefiting law industry.

Strangely  doctor’s fee are quite low but lawyers charges them astronomical amounts, which are beyond any logic.

      In a country where people  fight with their parents, brothers and  sisters for money and property, it will be naive to think that idea of making money from doctor  does not exist. With court compensations going into crores, doctors  can sense many times that some patient relatives  try to use the opportunity. They have nothing at stake so they try to make some noise on social media and harass the doctor in court or on social platforms. Even for patients, who had poor prognosis at the very onset of treatment, relatives can create problems, many times due to financial reasons. Doctors have no protection from these nuisance. All these factors further enhance insecurity in doctor’s mind.

It is  because of career building of few professions, that medico-legal cases are being fueled. Medical errors and complications are integral part of the treatment . Even simplest of diseases carry some amount of risk.  These  will still remain, even if doctors are hanged to death. Natural complications, poor prognosis can be attributed to errors by clever lawyering and because of benefit derived by other professions.

Many careers  are  shining in name of preventable deaths  and medical errors at the cost of medical profession.  The managers, right activists, media   and lawyers  have made their career and wealth out of it. Ask any doctor really, are these issues really preventable beyond  a point.  The  line separating errors or natural complications is really blurred and arbitrary. People who work in life and death situation know it well that  even natural poor prognosis can be labelled and proved as error by retrospective analysis and wisdom of hindsight and more certainly with luxury of time at disposal for lawyers and courts.

It becomes a unbalanced match specially when the amount of money which was paid to doctor to save a life was peanuts as compared to now being paid to punish him.

 Zero fee advertisements and fixed commission ads on television by lawyers in health systems in certain developed countries is an example of instigation against medical profession. They lure patients to file law suits and promise them hefty reimbursements. There is no dearth of such   relatives, lawyers who are ready to try their luck, sometimes in vengeance and sometimes for lure of money received in compensations.  This encouragement and instigation of lawsuit against doctors has become a major disadvantage for medical profession.

Sense of impending  injustice  is fueling among doctors, giving   a  feeling  of   sitting ducks  for harassment.

what if money is taken out of medico-legal cases

South Asians at higher health risks: Low lean mass


The research further establishes that this low lean mass has been a constant in South Asians for almost 11,000 years.

South Asians, even those who move to other countries, are at a higher risk of diabetes than people of most other ethnicity, and according to a study published last week in Nature Scientific Reports, the reason for this is their relatively low lean mass

The research further establishes that this low lean mass has been a constant in South Asians for almost 11,000 years.

Higher lean mass is associated with superior performance in some, but not all, sports.

Mesolithic hunter-gatherer ancestors of South Asians were much taller, but low lean mass has characterised South Asians for at least 11,000 years, putting them at higher risk of type-2 diabetes and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as heart disease, according to the study which analysed 197 archaeological and recent South Asian adult skeletons.

Height decreased by 8.5cm in men and 7.7cm in women when South Asians transitioned from hunting and gathering to farming around 9,000 years ago, but their lean mass (organ and muscle mass) has remained unchanged over the past 11,000 years, the study said.

Since changes in lean mass are unlikely over the next four to five generations, making lifestyle interventions are crucial to containing NCDs, which account for 60% of all deaths in India.

The study suggests that while height is determined by nutritional factors, physique (bone breadth and lean mass) reflects ecological pressures. “The decrease in height probably took place very quickly (over hundreds of years rather than thousands). After the initial drop in height with the adoption of farming, it then continued to decrease very slowly between about 5,000 years ago and today,” lead author Dr Emma Pomeroy, lecturer in the Evolution of Health, Diet and Disease, Department of Archaeology, University of Cambridge, said in an email interview. “The ancient origins of low lean mass in South Asians would be most consistent with long-term adaptations to ecological pressures, rather than more recent dietary change or the impact of 19th-20th century famines exacerbated by British colonial policy,” said the study. Ecological pressures include adaptation to a predominantly hot, equatorial climate, which may have led to selection for lower body mass (which generates less heat and increases heat loss through a greater surface area to volume ratio) to reduce thermal load. “Low lean mass is present at birth in South Asian babies compared with European babies; even after South Asian families migrate to other parts of the world, such as the UK, after several generations in this new environment, their children still have low lean mass compared with children of European ancestry. This strongly suggests a major heritable component to South Asian low lean mass, but the contributions of genetic, epigenetic and environmental conditions are still unclear,” said Dr Pomeroy, referring to a study on type-2 diabetes in migrant South Asians published in The Lancet in 2015. People of South Asian ancestry are at a higher risk of diabetes even after risks like unhealthy diet, sedentary lifestyles and obesity are factored in. For example, South Asians in London have a two to three times greater type 2 diabetes compared with those of European ancestry, with onset typically five years earlier and at a lower body mass index (by 5 kg/m2). “The implications of the study are that low lean mass is a very ancient characteristic, so it is unlikely to change much in the coming generations. This means that other interventions, especially the promotion of healthy lifestyles, are particularly critical to manage the growing health and economic burden of chronic diseases,” said Dr Pomeroy.

Building muscle mass and high fitness levels have the potential for averting diabetes, and even heart disease.

 

 

Silence of  REEL Heroes: #Aamir-Khan, when REAL Heroes  #doctor/nurses are thrashed #NRS-Hospital


                    When  examples of stray incidents were portrayed as general phenomenon on television and a great mistrust was created, the existing gap further  widened between  doctor – patient, the REEL hero #Aamir-khan got a great applause. Society believed  and trusted  the stars, who entertained , enacted stories and danced to make them happy, keeping them entertained. Masses believed easily, what  Reel hero, while entertaining  told them and not trusted the doctor, who was awake at nights to save their  lives. REEL heroes earned name,  fame and money  by unilateral poor projection of doctors in filmy stories, right or wrong or just stray incidents. Larger good work and hard work of doctors was of no consideration. Sad  era for medical profession, where reel heroes, who merely act are trusted more than real doers. Now when doctors are being nearly killed, just because  for being on the bedside of patients, the silence of REEL Heroes,  proves the  hollow applause, they have generated for themselves.

 NRS hospital 

Reblogged: #Soldier/Nurse/doctor vs Filmy superstar: Reel Heroes or Real Heroes. what does the   society Need/desire/deserve?

The old adage  “All that glitters is not Gold” is particularly relevant  in current era of media domination where media  projection shapes the perception and may defy  the  reality.  Media has dominated our lives and can sway the  opinion formation of masses.  Written media, television, social media  can collectively influence the mass opinion.

Society, in general, needs to be wise  enough  to realize the importance   of  getting  rid of  these blinders in  real life . One such factor that causes an illusional mist in the  thoughts of masses is projection in films. They create a mirage of illusional glitter wherein  there is blurring of real life from the reel life of heroes. The larger-than-life unreal persona of the celebrities on screen looks too charming and sometimes becomes undeniable and dominates mind of masses. The super-human characters played out in films appear to be real. The problem arises when the imaginary characters of the reel life stories are emulated in real life. Individuals as projected character fill in  peoples’ imagination and are perceived as real and   becomes ingrained in mind. The naivety of masses to perceive the projected character as real one  goes beyond a reasonable thought process and imagination. 

These roles played in films are  not  really act of   inspiration  in real life  as  the actual purpose accomplished in the end of a movie  is entertainment of society and business for themselves. A recent  candid  admission  by the actor # Mr-Irrfan-Khan  that film stars should  not be role models  was impressive (Hindustan times) .

   At the best, a particular projected character  (and  not individual acting star) may be a  role model. An actor or super star, is simply doing his work of “acting” in  the end. This work of acting may bring an entertainment of few hours at the most.

One  cannot stray away from the wisdom to  choose between what we consume merely for our entertainment and  what we believe or face in real life. One needs to differentiate between rationale truth behind the celebrity gimmicks in the media and exaggerated sensationalism. Sensation created merely for a commercial successful venture should not be allowed to overpower the judgments of real life.

But the problem starts, when these false perceptions created merely   by a projected  glimmer    takes the shimmer  away from the real worthy. The real  professionals and people who are worthy of glory become invisible behind  the glittery mist, a haze, which is unreal and unhelpful in real life.

   A  soldier contributes to our society much more in real terms. Even a junior doctor saves many lives in a  day in emergencies as compared to work of a superstar in films.  A teacher, nurse or scientist have contribution which is more fruitful to our generation. Also the scientists, who contribute immensely and bring about the  real change in our lives. Their contribution is huge to our society and much more than doing just acting on screen. The reel actor merely imitates the real life lived and actual work done by real heroes like soldier, doctor or teacher. Someone who only acts and  behaves like one, is respected and paid thousand times or more than the real one. In reality, people need  more than mere entertainment and reel role models and actors in their real lives.

 

Compare the trivial  amount of  remuneration, fame  and respect the real worker  gets  as compared to the film stars, who merely imitate their actions. Reel projection for purpose  of entertainment is more easier to enact and more profitable  than actual performance  in real life.  It is easier to become a reel hero, as it requires little hard work or just connections to get an opportunity.  Some one can be a reel hero just  by  dynastic factor  easily. Hard work is definitely required but that may or may not be prerequisite.

 

Even good films  may raise some social problem, which everyone knows already and offer no practical solution in reality. Therefore what good it brings to the public, beyond entertainment, is any body’s guess. The persona, actors usually  project on screen, may actually be far from his or her real personality. In most of cases, what he does in movies and reel life, is actually away from  possibility of real life . But strangely in present era, people lose sight of what is mere perception. It is clearly a story, tale, a drama, a myth and is not the real identity of the people, we see on-screen.

 

 

In present era, real contributions by people, who are saviours of human life and  the real heroes, remain unappreciated. People are so besotted by  fame and money that they fail to appreciate the sacrifices made by real heroes. Filmy super hero  just imitates  a doctor, soldier,  dacoit or a street hooligan and just pretends to be one on the screen.

But there are  real life heroes that exist around us. Doctors awake at night saving lives every minute or soldier in freezing cold are worthy  of more respect and are real heroes.  And it is up to the society  to look beyond the superficial and reel story, and focus on the real life actors. There has to be an true effort to make, respect and appreciate  real heroes.

Point to  ponder  is that whether society needs people  just  acting  ke   doctors,  soldiers  and not the  actual and real ones, who saves lives. Does Society need  only  entertainment, because respect  which is paid to someone who is  just  an   actor, is  not extended to real doctors, soldiers or other altruistic professions.

 A reel hero who acts like a soldier, is famous  and richer and than the  actual soldier, who dies unnamed and in penury.   Children of today’s times will strive  to become, who is worshiped and paid respect  by society and  therefore will prefer  to become reel heroes.

 

A  society truly needs the real people, who work and act for them, more than just entertainment. It will need total change in attitude of people to deconstruct the perceptions, which are based on mere projections and are away from reality.

It is time to recreate and worship real heroes, who have become invisible behind the glittery mist.

Society needs to envisage the bigger real picture, and should not be mistaken for another projected story.                          

The perception of the projection will decide, what does the   society actually  need- or desire-or deserve , “Reel Heroes or Real Heroes”.

Blatant cruelty & #oppression-of-doctors: Re-entering Hammurabi Era (1750BC)


Every doctor knows that some thing is really wrong happening against the profession.  Not only every day minor irritants but there  are recurring episodes of blatant cruelty against doctors. The whole profession is being criticized openly in the garb of stray incidences or in cases of genuine poor prognosis. Each and every doctors  wants  to react.  But no one knows  really “ how to do it”. There is scant  unity  amid this chaotic problem. The community has been broken  and pushed to behave as single suffering   individuals. whatever way  they choose to react ,  the slightest reaction may  invite the ire of many unknown people, may be mighty and revengeful.  

          By showing cruelty and being revengeful towards doctors , our society is in a way re-entering the realm of an ancient medical regulatory  system, Hammurabi Era (1750BC). Certain aggrieved health care consumers may welcome a move toward harsh penalties in the name of justice and simply for revenge but we need to keep in mind the  poor outcomes in complex diseases, limitation of science and of course the idiosyncrasies of the human body.  Fear factors and  Impact  of present legal complexities,  on doctors  is  already on a par with that of  Hammurabi  era.

Then why  doctors  be  made a punching bag for venting out emotions of the bereaved relatives. Nothing and really nothing can justify this barbaric act. Emotions should not be allowed to take such a demonic form.

This is simply jungle raj, goonism and  expression of a most  uncivilized kind of society, which simply cannot be excused by any sort of reasoning. The incident is being  protested by the professional bodies as is the routine and after few day things normalized for everybody else except that terrorized doctor .  

If the courts, the commission for women’s rights, and the human rights commission are maintaining silence, is it because the rights of doctors were never clearly defined and outlined.  The duties of a doctor have always been enumerated but the rights have never been discussed.

           Human rights of doctor and medical community have been grossly violated by physical assaults. It is painful to see that the authorities that are supposed to take action have maintained a silence all these years about this issue.

What is role of human rights commission, if rights of a hard working community like doctors are violated and what is it supposed to do? I really fail to understand what else will it take to shake them out of their stupor ?

NRS Hospital Violence

Hammurabi era

female doctor assault

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