Comparison of AIIMS (medical) and IIT (Engineer) graduate with 5 years invested. Do doctors deserve better salaries?


       Let us compare the start of career for medical and engineering graduates. To have a balance, comparing apples to apples, comparison of AIIMS graduates (premier institute –medical) to IIT graduates (Premier institute -Engineering) looks justified.  This goes without any need to emphasize that students selected in both are exceptionally brilliant and toppers of the country.

    Although this comparison is not a secret and everyone knows about it, but still it need an attention from a different point of view. It should be an eye opener not only to medical students or aspiring doctors but to the society as well. It projects the severe disparity to an extent of blatant injustice towards medical students.

  When engineering students after a course of  4 years  (at 21 years of age )are placed with package of 1.2 to 3.6 crores (1-4 lakh dollars), the medical students are starting with internship. Medical students still need to study for at least 5 years more (at 21 years of age ) to start earning maximum 12 -15 lakh per annum ( 15 thousand dollars). It may be raised to 24-30 lakhs (30000 dollars) per annum after 10 years, still one tenth of their contemporaries from IIT. Remember we are talking about only premier institutes, what happens to others is still a matter of luck.

   When engineering students earn crores, do jobs and get experience about the real world, medical students are worrying about the problems, which should not have been there in the first place. The common issues bogging down the medical students are trying to get into post graduate courses, inhuman duties lasting 24-48 hours, payment of unjustified fee of medical colleges, trying to fend off bond policies, court cases, bearing with assault on doctors, working in poor and inept health care infrastructure- just to name a few.  With all these problems lingering for years, doctors remain unwise in worldly matters, financially illiterate and sitting ducks for punishments due to excessive regulation and unjustified moral burden.  

      This comparison is essential to be kept in mind by aspiring doctors when they choose medical career. The respect and money associated with the hard work to be a good doctor is no more available even to the best.


   A Point to  ponder for everyone, what is the reason for such disparity?  Why doctors do not deserve better salaries? What is the need for  aspiring doctors to choose lowly  paid jobs for more hard work and more noble work? A fodder for thought for society  and administrators as well.

IIT hiring: Domestic offer hits record Rs 1.8 crore

IIT hiring: Domestic offer hits record Rs 1.8 crore

MUMBAI: After a lull in the first pandemic year, crore-plus job packages returned with a bang on premier IIT campuses. On the opening day of the season, several IITians entered the crore-plus salary club, as the highest domestic package touched an all-time high of Rs 1.8 crore and international offers crossed the Rs 2 crore mark. While Uber picked one student each from at least five IITs, including IITBombay and Madras, for a package of Rs 2.05 crore (or $274,000), one student at IIT-Roorkee received an international offer of Rs 2.15 crore ($287,550) and three others got domestic offers ranging from Rs 1.30 crore to Rs 1.8 crore. In the first slot at IITB, the highest offer after Uber came from cloud data management company Rubrik, with a Rs 90.6 lakh (or $121,000) package.  Of the domestic roles, investment management firm Millennium picked students for a package of Rs 62 lakh in the first slot, while WorldQuant offered Rs 52.7 lakh and Blackstone Rs 46.6 lakh. IIT-Madras students get 176 offers in first session on day 1 ALSO READ IIT-BHU student bags Rs 2 crore package from US company in placement . The highest numbers of domestic offers were made by Google, Microsoft, Qualcomm, Boston Consulting Group (BCG), Airbus and Bain & Company. IT/software, core engineering and consulting were the leading sectors to hire from the institute in the first slot. As many as 11 international offers were made at IIT-Madras on day one, said professor CS Shankar Ram, adviser (training and placement), IIT Madras. The institute recorded 407 offers in the first session of the placements, its best ever, including 231 PPOs. In all, 11 students received offers that crossed Rs 1 crore and of them 10 got domestic offers and 13 students signed up for an international offer, of which 12 opted for packages less than Rs 1 crore to take up jobs in Japan and Singapore.

Record Rs 3.6cr offers to 3 from Delhi, Bombay, Madras IITs for Hong Kong posting

MUMBAI: Hong Kong and Singapore seems to be the destinations where IITians are heading to this placement season, with most big-ticket offers being offered by trading firms there. Jane Street, a quantitative trading firm, has picked at least one student each from IIT-Bombay, Delhi and Kanpur for its Hong Kong office for a record package of Rs 3.6 crore. These, however, were made as pre-placement offers (PPOs) before the season kicked off on December 1. Another high-frequency trading firm Quantbox Research has made an offer of Rs 1.6 crore at multiple IITs for its Singapore office. one IIT-Bombay student, there are other PPOs that have made offers to students of close to Rs 2 crore,” said a source at IIT-B. On-campus job offers have not touched the Rs 2 crore mark. “There are several Rs 1 crore job offers and there are 15 companies with international locations, On the first day of placements, IIT-Bombay had 46 companies interviewing candidates either online or in-person. Of the 250 job offers on Day 1, more than 175 were accepted. On Day 2, a total of 48 companies were at IIT-B. The highest package so far this year domestically is Rs 1.9 crore, while there are a good number of packages from international recruiters as well.

Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

 21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

NEET- Not so Neat- percentile system

The  Myth  of  cost of  spending  on  medical  education needs to be made  transparent.

Assault on a Woman Doctor #Kerala: Medics Serving Uncivilized Society with Poor Law & Order


THIRUVANANTHAPURAM- Kerala: The assault on a woman doctor at Thiruvananthapuram Government Medical College has made doctors preparing for a career in the medical profession worried. A bystander kicked the woman doctor on her lower abdomen in front of an ICU in the middle of the night on November 23. The CCTV visuals showed that she was surrounded by a group of bystanders.

    The physical assault on a lady doctor reflects that doctors are serving an uncivilized society.  Such news is viewed by medical community anxiously and is definitely a poor advertisement for younger generation to take medicine as profession.

     Strangely media, courts, prominent people, celebrities, human right commission, woman right activists and women commission are little concerned about the blatant injustice done towards doctors.  This again brings forth the hypocrisy of these people and organizations, who otherwise cry hoarse about woman rights and empowerment.  Whenever a female is assaulted, there is an outrage but the same support is not extended to a female if she is a doctor. Such bestiality should create havoc in minds of civilized people but this apathy to such incidents clearly indicates otherwise. Have we become so uncivilized that an incident such as this just remains as a small news item in a local paper? Can’t we see that such incidents are harbinger of many more in future? It is important to realize that this is the time to unify and condemn such episodes vehemently and prominently so that the miscreants realize that they cannot get away with it.

     Brutality against doctors reveals a deep prejudice and lawlessness, merely on the basis of perceived negligence. Government is either unwilling to act and establish a strong culture of deterrence, so justice been elusive for medical professionals.

Even murderous assaults on doctors are not enough to shake administrators, courts  and doctors’  organizations  out of slumber.  Definitely such violence, if unabated will be   poor advertisement for   next generation to take medical profession as a first choice.

Media and celebrities   have proudly  projected in films and television that doctors can be beaten and assaulted, in case there are unexpected results or in case of dissatisfaction. The “Reel Heroes” depicting violence against the doctor is seen as a routine and looked as an   easily do-able- adventure due to unwillingness of  Government  to take stringent action. As patients will continue to get treatment in hospitals and few cannot be saved, so every death declaration may be a harbinger to such attacks in future.

A notion has been propagated   that   assaulting a doctor under emotional  outburst  to be taken as normal and should not be punished.

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: The assault on a woman doctor at Thiruvananthapuram Government Medical College has made doctors preparing for a career in the medical profession worried. A bystander kicked the woman doctor on her lower abdomen in front of an ICU in the middle of the night on November 23. The CCTV visuals showed that she was surrounded by a group of bystanders. She survived the attack and is recuperating. But the incident has left her shattered. “I am reconsidering my decision to become a neurosurgeon and even the career of a doctor,” she told Sulphi N, IMA state president, when he visited her in the hospital.The Kerala Medical Post Graduate Association has taken up her cause and demanded justice.

They are worried that such attacks would happen again and there would be a new victim. “It is unnerving that such attacks happen in medical colleges which are supposed to be a secure location. What will happen to us if we go to peripheral hospitals for practice,” said Dr Ruwise E A, Thiruvananthapuram unit president of Kerala Medical Post Graduate Association.He came to know from police officers that an arrest was unlikely on Friday and the accused was trying to secure bail. “The government should have arrested the culprit immediately and sent a message to the public that such attacks are not tolerated,” said Dr Ruwise.KMPGA plans to strengthen the strike if there is no arrest till Sunday. The doctors association has extended support to the protest by residents. “We cannot leave the students alone on this issue. It was an assault on a woman who was doing her duty. If it was a senior doctor who received such a kick on the lower abdomen he or she would not have survived the attack,” said Dr Nirmal Bhaskar, state president of Kerala Government Medical College Teachers Association (KGMCTA).The doctors share their angst as there was not enough support from government and society even when the attacks keep repeating. They did not take the Facebook post by Health Minister Veena George condemning the attack seriously.There are health experts who think that a multi-pronged approach is necessary to prevent such attacks. It involves reducing the crowd by strengthening peripheral hospitals, increasing staff and providing better security.“The government health system has become an easy target nowadays. Such attacks do not happen in private hospitals where bystanders pay the remaining hospital bills without uttering a word of protest even after the patient could not be rescued,” said Dr Althaf A, secretary of IMA, Thiruvananthapuram branch. He pointed out that there are no trained administrative cadres to manage a 4,000-bed MCH. All of this is managed by a superintendent who is also a professor with teaching responsibilities.

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

 21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

NEET- Not so Neat- percentile system

The  Myth  of  cost of  spending  on  medical  education needs to be made  transparent.

SC Rejects Greedy decision by Govt & Private Medical College-Fee Hike


 

    The Supreme Court set aside an Andhra Pradesh government order of 2017 prescribing a seven-fold increase in MBBS fees that made it ₹24 lakh per annum.

The Supreme Court in a judgment on Monday held that education is not a business to earn profit as it set aside an Andhra Pradesh government order of 2017 prescribing a seven-fold increase in MBBS fees that made it ₹24 lakh per annum.

Directing the private colleges to refund the amount collected in excess of the fees last fixed by the state government in 2011, a bench of justices MR Shah and Sudhanshu Dhulia said, “Education is not the business to earn profit. The tuition fee shall always be affordable.”

The order came on a petition filed by the Narayana Medical College challenging a September 2019 decision of the Andhra Pradesh high court striking down the fee increase and ordering refund to students admitted in the college since the academic year 2017-18. The apex court dismissed the petition with cost of ₹5 lakh to be borne equally by the petitioner college and state government and deposited in court within six weeks. The amount was directed for use in legal services by the Supreme Court Mediation and Conciliation Committee and the National Legal Services Authority.

The top court agreed with the conclusion made by the high court and said, “To enhance the fee to ₹24 lakh per annum, I.e., seven times more than the fee fixed earlier was not justifiable at all.” The aggrieved medical students who had to pay through their nose had said that the government order raising the fees issued on September 6, 2017 was done without awaiting the recommendation of the Admission and Fee Regulatory Committee (AFRC).

The bench held the order passed by the state government to be “wholly impermissible and most arbitrary”. The court even went to the extent of saying that the hike was done “only with a view to favour or oblige the private medical colleges.”

“Any enhancement of the tuition fee without the recommendation of the AFRC shall be contrary to the decision of this court in case of P.A Inamdar in 2005 and the relevant provisions of the 2006 AFRC Rules (prevailing in the state). The high court has rightly quashed and set aside the GO dated September 6, 2017.”

The students pointed out that in 2011, the tuition fee hike was introduced by the state after consulting AFRC. However, in 2019, the state acted solely on representations received from private medical colleges. Rule 4 of the Admission and Fee Regulatory Committee (for Professional Courses offered in Private, Unaided Professional Institutions) Rules, 2006 mandated the state to seek a prior report from AFRC before altering the fee.

This rule required AFRC to factor in the location of the institution, nature of professional course, cost of available infrastructure, expenditure on administration and maintenance, reasonable surplus required for growth and development of the institution, revenue foregone on account of waiver of fee in respect of students from reserved category or economically weaker sections (EWS) of the society.

The top court said, “Determination of fee/review of fee shall be within the parameters of the fixation rules and shall have the direct nexus on the factors mentioned in Rule 4 of the 2006 Rules…the state government enhanced the tuition fee at an exorbitant rate of ₹24 lakh per annum, almost seven times the tuition fee notified for the previous block period.”

The next question arose regarding refund as ordered by the high court in its order of September 24, 2019. The high court said that the colleges cannot take benefit of the unjust enrichment in fees that was wrongly increased. Accordingly, it asked the colleges to refund the students after adjusting the amounts payable under the earlier fee structure recommended by AFRC and issued in June 2011.

The bench upheld this part of the high court order and said, “The medical colleges are the beneficiaries of the illegal GO which is rightly set aside by the high court.” The bench was conscious of the hardships faced by students who arranged to pay the amount by obtaining loan from banks and financial institutions at high rate of interest. “The management cannot be permitted to retain the amount recovered or collected pursuant to the illegal GO,” it held.

The college told the Supreme Court that between 2011 and 2017, they incurred added expenses due to the requirement introduced in 2016 to pay stipend to students even as the fee remained unchanged since 2011. The bench told the college that this component would be compensated as and when the higher tuition fee is fixed by AFRC. However, the court did not permit the college to retain the illegally collected amount.

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

 21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

NEET- Not so Neat- percentile system

The  Myth  of  cost of  spending  on  medical  education needs to be made  transparent.

Projection of  Inflated Cost of Medical Education- Global Exploitation of Young Doctors


The  Myth  of  cost of  spending  on  medical  education needs to be made  transparent.

Educating a doctor cost less what   medical colleges  claim- a global phenomenon.

   Instead of   often  repeated statements  about high expense on running medical college and  projecting it   as a  hard  fact, the amount spent  on  medical students by all medical colleges should be made transparent by all institutions. The  frequent  statement  is made that  cost of  making a doctor is very high and  gleefully  propagated  by  the  private medical colleges to extract millions out of  young  medical students . 

Such statements without any actual public data  is repeated  to the   extent  that  it  is  firmly  entrenched  in  public  mind without any real evidence.

     High cost  is  the  reason    with an intention  to  exploit the young doctors in various ways to get cheap labour and extract  millions from aspiring doctors  by private medical colleges.

      The  basis  of  such calculation should be transparent for every medical college and all institutions. 

       In any medical college,  only the   Departments  of  Anatomy and Physiology  are purely for medical students. The  remaining  subjects  taught  in  medical  colleges  across  the  country  are  related  to  patient 

care  and  medical  education  is only  a  by-product.  All the medical teachers are actually doctors involved in treatment of patients, running  the hospital  and students observe the treatment and learn medicine. The interns and  postgraduate  students  provide the cheap and labour and actually save the costs of running the hospital.

 Therefore   if  some college   is  actually  spending  millions   to  produce  one  MBBS  doctor ,  it  is  a  either an   inefficient  model   or costs are inflated and exaggerated to exploit the young doctors.

Educating a doctor cost less what   medical colleges claim

The average cost of producing a doctor or nurse went down across most parts of the world between 2008 and 2018, but almost tripled in China and doubled in India, a Lancet study shows. Despite this, the estimated expenditure per medical graduate in China at $41,000 is higher only than in sub-Saharan Africa and about 42% lower than in India ($70,000) against a global average of $114,000. The pattern was the same for nurses with the estimated expenditure per nursing graduate dropping across the world while it went up by 167% in China and doubled in India. The only other region where the per graduate cost went up was in North Africa, where cost per doctor went up by 47% and by 25% for nurses. Approximately $110 billion was invested globally by governments and students’ families in medical and nursing education in 2018. Of this, $60.9 billion was invested in doctors and $48.8 billion was invested in nurses and midwives, the study estimated.

The paper looks at important developments in medical education to assess potential progress and issues with education of health professionals after the Covid-19 pandemic. Mean costs in 2018 were $114,000 per doctor and $32,000 per nurse. In 2008, China had the lowest estimated expenditure per medical graduate at just $14,000 (Rs 6 lakh) followed by India, where it was just $35,000 (Rs 15 lakh at the 2008 exchange rate of Rs 43 to a dollar). This is much lower than the estimate of Rs 1 crore or more that Indian colleges widely claim as expenditure per medical graduate.

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

 21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

ZERO Percentiles Requirement to be a Super Specialist Doctor- a Cruel Joke


          MUMBAI: With hundreds of medical super specialty course seats vacant, the authorities have removed the qualifying mark criterion for aspirants. So, rock-bottom scores or a zero percentile would be acceptable for a course at this level.

            Such decisions appear to be   cruel joke to the life of patients. A wise decision would be to review into reasons for vacant seats for example- policies, fee structure, facilities, demand for the course, and disillusionment of students by existing system or falling percentages to be a super-specialist doctor.  

          Imagine, an opportunity is available to a patient, to decide the doctor as based on his route or marks for entry into medical college. Whether patient will like to get treated by a doctor, who   secured 20% marks, 30 % marks or 60% marks or 80% marks for medical college.  Even   an illiterate person can answer that well. But strangely for selection of doctors, rules were framed so as to dilute the merit to the minimum possible. So that a candidate who scores 15-20 % marks also becomes eligible to become a doctor. That is now further diluted to nearly Zero percentile. Answer to that is simple.  To select and find only those students, who can pay millions to become doctors,  and hence marks and quality of doctors don’t matter?  

   If the society continues to accept such below par practices, it has to introspect, whether it actually deserves to get good doctors. Paying the irrational fee of medical colleges may be unwise idea for the candidates, especially those who are not from strong financial backgrounds. But at the same time unfortunately, it may be a compulsion and entrapment for students, who have entered the profession and there is no way  forward.  

So, rock-bottom scores or a zero percentile would be acceptable for a course at this level.

      Society needs to choose and nurture a force of doctors carefully with an aim to combat for safety of its own people. If society has failed to demand for a good doctors and robust system, it should not rue scarcity of good doctors. Merit based cheap good medical education system is the need of the society. This is in interest of society to nurture good doctors for its own safety.      The quality of doctors who survive and flourish in such system will be a natural consequence of how society chooses and nurtures the best for themselves.

    MUMBAI: With hundreds of medical super specialty course seats vacant, the authorities have removed the qualifying mark criterion for aspirants. So, rock-bottom scores or a zero percentile would be acceptable for a course at this level. “Seats have been going vacant every year. The government felt that as a one-time measure, in the larger context of things, we can even accept students with a zero percentile. This will not have any precedence. It is being taken up as a test case. After all, the entrance test was not conducted to eliminate students, but merely to grade them,” said a senior officer from the health ministry. With 748 super speciality seats unfilled after four rounds of admission this year, the Medical Counselling Committee (MCC) took the drastic step. As a one-time measure, any candidate who had taken the NEET super speciality 2021 exam can participate in the special mop-up admission round irrespective of his/her scores.

When admissions began this year, two rounds conducted by the MCC got a cold response. This led to a special mop-up round with the qualifying bar lowered by 15%. Yet, there weren’t many takers. Now the second mop-up round is open to all aspirants. India has about 4,500 super specialty medical seats. There is more vacancy in the surgical branches than the clinical ones. “Candidates have realised that having a broad speciality gives them a good career and money. Hence, many do not want to spend more time in pursuing a super specialty course,” said Dr Pravin Shingare, former head of the Directorate of Medical Education and Research (DMER). “If you look at Grant Medical College, 80% seats in super specialty have been lying vacant for 10 years. At GS Medical College, 40% seats in the last 4-5 years have been unfilled,” he added. But the trend has extended to the non-surgical branches too in the past three years. The bias in selecting programmes often is dictated by considerations that in the case of a surgical branch, a candidate needs to work with a team, have an operation theatre, but a clinical course allows the doctor to work independently out of a clinic.

Parent representative Sudha Shenoy said the problem also lies with the long bond that candidates need to serve if they join a government college. “Any candidate who joins a super specialty programme would be at least 30 years old. If they have to serve a 10-year bond, when will they start earning? So, government hospitals go off most students’ choice list. And when it comes to private and deemed institutes, the fee is out of bounds for most,” explained Shenoy

Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes        

 21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons              

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

Demonize Doctors: New Fad of Administrators- Accepted Norm for Populism? #Dr-Raj-Bahadur-VC-BFUHS Resigns


Dr Raj Bahadur, the vice-chancellor of Baba Farid University of Health Sciences (BFUHS) in the state’s Faridkot district Punjab, submitted his resignation to the Chief Minister’s Office late on the night of Friday, July 29.  He has resigned after state health minister allegedly forced him to lie on a dirty mattress at a hospital.

         Administrators, who have never treated a patient in their lifetimes, not only try to control treatment of thousands of patients, but project themselves messiah by demonizing doctors. Lowly educated celebrities and administrators have found a new easy way to project themselves on higher pedestrian by publically insulting highly educated but vulnerable doctors. The biggest tragedy to the medical profession in the present era is the new fad of administrators to discourage and demonize  the  medical profession for their popularity gains.
          Being  so distant from the ground reality, their role should not have been more than facilitators, but they have become medical  administrators. To control the health system, administrators have a tendency to pretend that shortcomings in the patient care can be rectified by punishing the doctors and nurses.
          Such vulnerability to insult is intrinsic to the doctors’ work, makes them sitting ducks, an easy target for harassment and punishments, if administrators wishes to do so. This vulnerability is exploited by everyone to their advantage. Administrators use this vulnerability to supress them. It is used by media and   celebrities who projected themselves as Messiah for the cause of patients, and sell their news and shows by labelling the whole community of doctors as king of fleece tragedy based on just one stray incident. 

       The painful incident of Dr Raj Bahadur’s   humiliation unmasks the everyday struggle of the doctors in the present era. His resignation  after the public insult  depicts the plight of doctors – being undervalued and demonized by administrators, forced to work as a sub-servant to bureaucrats, irresponsible policing, blackmail by goons and vulture journalism-all have become an accepted form of harassment.  The incident has unveiled the despondency, moral burden of mistrust that doctors carry.

  Sadly, the society is unable to realize its loss.

    Bullied by  administrative systems,  indifference of Government and venomous media has made it impossible for health care workers to work in a peaceful environment.  Is there any punishment for the  administrators for mismanagement or poor infrastructure or lack of funds? Looks impossible but punishment to the sufferers is on the cards.

     Medical students or aspiring doctors should be carefully watching the behaviour and cruelty by which doctors are governed, regulated and treated by administrators. Mere few words of respect and false lip service during Covid-pandemic  should not mask the real face of administrators, indifference of courts and harshness of Government towards medical profession. Choosing medical careers can land anyone into the situations, which are unimaginable in a civilized world. Role of doctor associations, parent institutes has remained more or less weak, spineless and not encouraging.

     Hence by selective projection the blame for deficiencies of inept system, powerful industry, inadequate infrastructure and poor outcomes of serious diseases is shifted conveniently to doctors, who are unable to retaliate to the powerful media machinery.

Faridkot district, submitted his resignation to the Chief Minister’s Office late on the night of Friday, July 29.

 

       New Delhi: The vice-chancellor of a medical college in Punjab has resigned after state health minister allegedly forced him to lie on a dirty mattress at a hospital.

Dr Raj Bahadur, the vice-chancellor of Baba Farid University of Health Sciences (BFUHS) in the state’s Faridkot district, submitted his resignation to the Chief Minister’s Office late on the night of Friday, July 29.

Hours earlier state health minister Chetan Singh Jouramajra had asked him to lie down on a dirty mattress during an inspection of Faridkot’s Guru Gobind Singh Medical College and Hospital, which comes under the BFUHS.

A video clip of the incident that circulated on the social media, showed Jouramajra place a hand on the veteran surgeon’s shoulder as he pointed towards the “damaged and dirty condition” of the mattress inside the hospital’s skin department.

The minister then allegedly forced Bahadur to lie down on the same mattress.

Though the vice-chancellor himself did not confirm his resignation, highly placed sources in the health department confirmed the same to multiple outlets. When approached for comments,  reports that The Tribune Bahadur said, “I have expressed my anguish to the Chief Minister and said I felt humiliated.”

Reports have it that chief minister Bhagwant Mann has expressed his displeasure over the incident and spoken to Jouramajra. Mann has also asked Bahadur to meet him next week.

Speaking to The Indian Express, Bahadur additionally said: “I have worked in 12-13 hospitals so far but have never faced such behaviour from anyone till now. I shouldn’t have been treated this way… it affects this noble profession. It is very painful. He showed his temperament, I showed my humility.”

Bahadur is a specialist in spinal surgery and joint replacement and a former director-principal of Government Medical College and Hospital in Chandigarh. He has also been the head of the orthopaedic department at PGIMER, Chandigarh.

Asked whether new mattresses had been ordered for the hospital, he said: “Two firms sent their quotations and the rate finalisation needs to be done. It is a 1,100-bed hospital and not all mattresses are in bad condition. This mattress shouldn’t have been there but hospital management is the prerogative of the Medical Superintendent.”

Speaking to reporters at the hospital, Jouramajra said: “My intention was not to do any inspection. In fact, I am visiting various hospitals to see what the requirements are so that we can fulfil them.”

Various quarters, including the Indian Medical Association, have criticised Jouramajra.

PCMS Association, a doctors’ body in Punjab, to,  in a statement, strongly condemned the “unceremonious treatment” meted out to Bahadur. PCMSA said the way the V-C was treated was “deplorable”, its reason notwithstanding.

The body expressed its “deep resentment” over the incident and said “public shaming of a senior doctor on systemic issues is strongly condemn-able.”

Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes        

 21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons              

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

NMC’s Opaque Policy on Medical College Infrastructure of Disastrous Consequences


        Quality of medical education is a deciding factor for the kind of doctors and hence the character of the treatment that patients are going to get.  Transparency about the infrastructure and faculty of medical college are important and the deciding factors about the credibility of the institute. But the new opaqueness (by National Medical council- NMC) in the system displaying the critical details about medical colleges can have deleterious effects on medical education. The medical students are blind about the claims made by a medical college during inspection for recognition and permission to admit students, which may be not true. There have been many instances and several complaints of ghost faculty in private colleges and mass transfer of faculty during inspection from one government medical college to another.  Not only medical students pay millions to have a seat in private medical colleges, they invest their prime life time in studying medicine. Such opaqueness has a potential to ruin their careers. Medical students will have to work harder to get true information and more careful, about the institute they are getting into.  

NMC’s college infra reports not public, MCI notes taken down too

NMC’s college infra reports not public, MCI notes taken down too

      The National Medical Commission (NMC) does not post college infrastructure assessment reports on its website and has also removed all previous assessment reports posted by the erstwhile Medical Council of India (MCI). So, students or members of the public cannot know what claims were made by a medical college during inspection for recognition and permission to admit students. Why are these assessment reports important? The reports reveal the date of inspection, the names and designation of the inspectors, usually experienced medical faculty from government medical colleges, along with their comments and findings. They reveal what kind of infrastructure existed or was claimed, including inpatient and outpatient load, number of beds and facilities in the teaching hospital and in the college. They reveal the number of faculty shown as employed by the college department-wise. With about 50 new medical colleges opening in 2021, a record for a single year, and especially unusual since it was the peak pandemic year, there were several complaints of ghost faculty in private colleges and mass transfer of faculty during inspection from one government medical college to another. “Not uploading assessment reports shields such substandard colleges with inadequate faculty and infrastructure. They just want to claim more colleges have been opened and that more MBBS seats have been created. It is a numbers game, quality be damned. In the case of private colleges, getting approval without adequate infrastructure or faculty is a windfall as they charge exorbitant fees from students. Usually, approval is given for 100-150 seats. Even at Rs 15 lakh per annum as tuition fees, the college gets to collect Rs 15 crore to Rs 22.5 crore from the first batch,” said a retired professor of a government medical college. “The MCI, which was labelled corrupt and non-functional, used to post the reports of assessments of infrastructure and faculty done according to minimum standard requirements each year,” said Dr Mohammed Khader Meeran, an RTI activist. In response to Dr Meeran’s RTI application seeking college assessment reports of academic years 2020-21 and 2021-22, the NMC said that “the information sought is very voluminous and scattered in various files” and that “it would disproportionately divert the resource of MARB (Medical Assessment & Rating Board) of NMC”.

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A Central Law Needed for Violence against Doctors: IMA to NMC


 

Medical professionals often face a trade-off between the Hippocrates Oath that they take and the necessity of their own well-being.

Unfortunately, abusive and violent behaviour by patients or relatives or those accompanying patients has become one of the attendant risks of the medical profession. It is no surprise then that the medical fraternity has once again called upon the government to enact stringent laws and their proper implementation to curtail this kind of behaviour with the National Medical Commission (NMC) proposing that registered medical practitioners (RMPs) refuse to take on such cases.

The NMC (which replaced the Medical Council of India) is a body that regulates medical education and professionals.

The NMC’s Ethics and Medical Registration Board has issued draft regulations inviting comments from the public, experts, stakeholders and organisations on “National Medical Commission, Registered Medical Practitioner (Professional Conduct) Regulations 2022”.

Comments and suggestions on the draft proposal can be sent by June 22.

A Central Law Needed for violence against doctors: IMA to NMC

“In case of abusive, unruly, and violent patients or relatives, the RMP can document and report the behaviour and refuse to treat the patient. Such patients should be referred for further treatment elsewhere,” the draft proposal says.

 “If a change of RMP is needed (for example, the patient needs a procedure done by another RMP), consent should be obtained from the patient himself or the guardian. The RMP who attends to the patient will be fully accountable for his actions and entitled to the appropriate fees,” it added.

Medical professionals often face a trade-off between the Hippocrates Oath that they take and the necessity of their own well-being. Sahajanand Prasad Singh, president, Indian Medical Association (IMA, a panel that represents doctors and their interests), said a doctor would be ethically wrong if he or she refuses treatment to someone in need. So the need of the hour is to have a central law to check such untoward incidents, said Dr Singh.

“The government passed an Epidemic Diseases (Amendment) Act in 2020 which provided acts of violence against healthcare personnel during any situation akin to current pandemic to be cognizable and nonbailable offences. This law should remain in force forever. If the NMC wants the welfare of doctors, they should work in that direction,” he added.

“The commission or abetment of such acts of violence shall be punished with imprisonment for a term of three months to five years, and with fine of Rs 50,000 to Rs 2,00,000,” says the Epidemic Diseases (Amendment) Act, 2020.

Former IMA president Rajan Sharma, who led a nationwide protest condemning violence against doctors in India, said without a Union home ministry law against attacks on doctors, these proposals would do very little to prevent incidents against healthcare workers.

“There has to be strong laws to deal with the rising cases of violence. The regulations made by NMC should be in tandem with the stringent laws from the Union home ministry,” Dr Sharma said.

On his part, IMA general secretary Jayesh Lele, “It’s only a draft regulation, we are going to submit our important observations to the NMC.”

Anuj Aggarwal, general secretary, Federation of Resident Doctors Association of India, said the RMP Professional Conduct Guidelines offers some breather for resident doctors but has some way to go.

“The guidelines give rightful exceptions to patients with life-threatening conditions, which is justified. However, it is important to consider that most of the events in which a patient’s attendants turn violent are when the patient is very critically ill. So this proposal has no role to play in the majority of such scenarios,” he said.

Dr Aggarwal said that while it is a welcome step to curb the issue of rising violence against doctors, a central law would be a better and more effective deterrent.

The government did propose a central protection act and a draft was put in the public domain in 2019 for feedback but it was put on the back burner.

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Dr Manjula Case NHS-UK: Semantics-Regulator’s own Fitness to Practice Doubtful? #GMC-UK


Regulation of the medical profession has become a tool to oppress doctors.

  Dr Manjula Arora case (NHS-UK) unmasks the everyday struggle of the doctors in present era. Being undervalued and demonized, forced to work as sub-servant to administrators and regulators are considered new normal and has become an accepted form of harassment.  Fatigue and burnout are thought to be routine side effects of being a doctor or nurse.   The unhindered over-regulation has left no stone unturned in spreading hatred and creating an environment of mistrust against the medical profession.  Single stray or a trivial incident   is projected    as an example to portray poor image of medical profession as generalization and as a token of the ‘excellent’ work done by administrators and regulators.   Doctors have become soft targets because of their nature of work as they deal with life and death.   Any trivial issues such as semantics used by Dr Manjula Arora (in this case) were blown out of proportion  and   GMC finds this  as an  opportunity  to send a strict message to the whole profession.  Such incidence  show that regulators and administrators  can use the nature of doctors’ work to be  used against medical profession to make saviours as an  easy prey for  punishments   on the pretext of  dishonesty, negligence or semantics being used  as  legal weapons by law-enforcers, even in case of a perceived bias. In the process of such ‘tokenism’ administrators prove their relevance to the system.

       Regulation of the medical profession has become a tool to oppress doctors. Driving the narrative of doctors as “perfect” beings causes more harm to the doctor-patient relationship than not. Constantly seeking to attain perfection is the very approach that leads to burn out, and more mistakes- causing patient harm.

Dr Manjula Arora’s case

Dr Manjula Arora’s case

Dr Arora has been a doctor since 1988 and is of good character. She asked her employer for a laptop. For context, most employees would reasonably expect their employer to provide work-related IT equipment. She was told that none were available, but her interest would be noted for the next roll-out. Many people would interpret this positive response to mean that they would get a laptop in due course. Clearly if her employer did not intend for her to have a laptop, they could simply have said so. Dr Arora spoke to her IT department about getting a laptop and said she had been ‘promised’ one.

And that’s it. That is the entire extent of her ‘misconduct’.

One could regard her statement as a minor exaggeration, or loose terminology, or careless language or verbal shorthand over a trivial subject.  But no one  should consider it to amount to ‘dishonesty’ unless interpret it in biased manner.

The tribunal took a different view. They concluded that ordinary, decent people would consider her use of the single word ‘promised’ as dishonest.  The tribunal further decided that this so-called dishonesty amounted to misconduct.

They also considered that the misconduct was serious.

They decided her fitness to practice was impaired, and that it was necessary to suspend her to send a message to the profession.The regulator has a difficult task. Good regulation protects patients. Poor regulation harms patients, because doctors will run away from a toxic regulatory environment.

Manjula Arora case: the GMC stumbles again? -BMJ

      The case of Manjula Arora, a GP in Manchester, who has been suspended for a month for supposed “dishonesty” about a laptop, was picked up by a few colleagues, and social media did its work of ensuring the pick-up rate increased exponentially.  One always worries about the latest “MedTwitter” controversy. But this one has come on back of seething annoyance among many doctors about our regulator—the General Medical Council (GMC)—and its perceived bias, with cases such as those of Hadiza Bawa-Garba and Omer Karim still fresh in our memories.

Couple this with the recent Medical Workforce Race Equality Standard (MWRES) data confirming a clear association of increased referrals and convictions on the basis of racial background—or indeed country of origin as regards training—and this case lit the touch paper.

If one considers the publicly available details of the whole trial, you have to scratch your head and wonder how it got to this stage?   Would this happen if the name of the individual was, for example, Michael Andrews?  

The relevance of this case stood on two things—any harm to the patient population, which, to me, should be the primary aim of the GMC, and then dishonesty and disrepute brought upon the medical community.

This ruling makes it clear that there is no risk of harm to the public: “The Tribunal considered that no issues in relation to patient safety had been identified in this case. Dr Arora is a competent clinician, and there is no necessity to protect the public.” That should have ended the issue. But the complications started when interpretation about honesty came into the picture.

“The Tribunal attached significant weight to the fact that Dr Arora’s misconduct was a single incident in relation to the use of a single word, with no evidence of any other similar episodes of dishonesty before or after the event.” If you go into the details of the case, it becomes even more murky, as it’s the interpretation of a word—subjective at best— against the background of someone for whom English is not their first language. But it was deemed enough to warrant a month’s suspension according to the tribunal: “this period would send an appropriate message to the medical profession and to the wider public that Dr Arora’s misconduct, albeit relating to a single fleeting moment of dishonesty and not a planned deception.”

This raises a multitude of questions. Firstly, there is the principle that one fleeting moment of dishonesty could result in suspension. If that’s the standard, then the profession is indeed in trouble, with the GMC now making subjective judgements and being an arbiter of what is deemed to be honest or not. Where does the line get drawn? Discussions about patients or conversations about whether Santa exists or not?

Secondly, and more importantly, there is the suspicion of bias in how that law is being applied. Daniel Sokol has written a recent column which discusses the notion of doctors as the “saintly being”; the epitome of perfection at all times. Yet, within all of us exist the same prejudices and flaws as for the rest of the population. Sokol suggests that doctors have to be “scrupulously honest—in and out of work—unless the situation obviously allows for ethical dishonesty.” Yet he makes no mention of the fact that the GMC seems to apply that principle unevenly across the board. I accept that it can be difficult to see the “problem” others are complaining about, but I can assure you there are very few international medical graduates who have read about Arora’s case and not thought “I know why this has happened.”

There is professionalism, but there is humanity too, and I would propose that driving the narrative of doctors as “perfect” beings causes more harm to the doctor-patient relationship than not. What is honesty? Saying to patients that they need to wait for another 16 hours to get a bed, or holding the hand of the elderly frail lady, comforting her and saying “I am sure something will come up shortly”? It brings back the concept that being a doctor is a vocation. Constantly seeking to attain perfection is the very approach that leads to burn out, and more mistakes—causing patient harm.

Finally, if the role of the GMC is to protect the public from “single moments of untruth,” as this destroys the view among the public that doctors are saints (although I am pretty sure the public don’t see doctors like that in modern life), then there needs to be a discussion of that concept, of the overreach into personal lives, and of where the line is drawn as regards the GMC’s intrusion and inordinate application of that principle. I would suggest the role of the regulator should be for the rare circumstances when there is an interest in behaviour not being repeated or where it cannot be dealt with effectively by an employer.

I work with the GMC closely these days, and I find it immensely frustrating to see such cases as they undermine some significant hard work that is being done by individuals who are determined to change the narrative that the GMC is biased. I would encourage all concerned to look into this case, review it, learn from it, and offer support to Arora. There is a lot of work in hand to repair the damage from the Bawa Garba case, and this case could reinforce those sentiments, which we must avoid.

The intention may once have been for doctors to be Superman, but modern times and the foibles of individuals only permit a Batman. It’s worth remembering neither of them work to harm the public.

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

 21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

A comparison of imparting Justice Vs Health: Grave injustice to medical professionals


        Justice is needed for satisfaction of soul and peaceful mind, is of same importance what is to the health of body. Justice delayed gives a sense of hurt and pain to soul. Pendency in courts simply reflects the grave injustice people are living with.

 Pendency in courts casts a ‘pall of gloom’, presents a hopeless situation: AG

          Justice and Health- Both are crucial for happiness of the living beings as well as society as a whole.  Hospitals are full of patients and so are courts with litigants. None of the people go to hospital and courts happily and everyone invariably wants early relief.

   Compare the situation in courts with a hospital.  Once a patient visits hospital, he will be treated almost instantaneously; irrespective how many patients’ doctors might have to examine in a day or night. There is almost nil pendency in hospitals, be it day or night, emergency or routine cases.

     Now can we expect similar treatment at courts? Do the people visiting courts are imparted justice in real sense.  Doctors get few minutes to decide. Most of the time, for the investigations and the treatment few visits are required. But there is no pendency. In Government hospitals, even appointments are not given. A doctor sitting in outdoor will see hundreds of patients. On emergencies night duties, doctor will not be able to count how many he/she has stabilized or numbers treated.

      Even in such chaotic systems, doctor can be punished, dragged to courts or assaulted for unintentional mistakes, that are  almost always secondary to load of patients or inept infrastructure.

     The work at hospital continues day and night, 24 hours and 365 days, despite almost always lesser number of doctors and required manpower. Systems in hospitals  are designed and maintained meticulously   to have no pendency what-so-ever situation is.   Larger number of patients go back home treated well and very few unfortunate patients are unable to recover, but still whatever is required- is done invariably.

Pendency in courts casts a ‘pall of gloom’ , presents a hopeless situation: AG

NEW DELHI: India’s top law officer K K Venugopal on Friday said litigants’ fundamental right to speedy justice lay in tatters and implored country’s top judges to take drastic measures to arrest their waning confidence in justice delivery system caused by monstrous pendency of 4.8 crores cases, many for decades. When we look at the pendency, a pall of gloom settles. We find that we are in a hopeless situation,” Venugopal said, “How has the justice delivery system deteriorated to this extent? If you look at the pendency over the years, we realise that over a lakh of cases are pending for more than 30 years at trial court level and 10-15 years in HCs. How do you believe that so far as litigants are concerned they would have confidence in the justice delivery system?” “But against whom the poor litigant can complain, or an under trial who is incarcerated for a number of years which he would have undergone had he been convicted and punished? Do they file a case for enforcement of their fundamental right? But against whom?

44 million pending court cases: How did we get here?

       There are about 73,000 cases pending before the Supreme Court and about 44 million in all the courts of India, up 19% since last year.

According to a 2018 Niti Aayog strategy paper, at the then-prevailing rate of disposal of cases in our courts, it would take more than 324 years to clear the backlog.

Grave injustice for medical professions:

  1.  A doctor making wrong diagnosis (gets few minutes to decide) can be prosecuted, but courts giving wrong verdicts (get years to decide) are immune?

     2. Compare the remuneration of lawyers to doctors. Doctors gets few hundreds to save a life (often with abuses) and lawyers can get paid in millions (happily).

      3. Doctors treat the body and larger is still not fully known about mechanisms. Still doctors can be blamed for unanticipated events. Whereas  law is a completely known and written subject.

   4. If health is citizen’s right so should be a timely justice.

         Despite doing so much for patients, still people’s behaviour to doctors and hospitals is not respectful. Doctors are punished for slight delays and people and courts remain intolerant to unintentional mistakes. But people can’t behave in the same manner to courts and legal system and keep on tolerating the blatant injustice for years. 

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

 21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

   

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