Admin Apathy- Kerala Doctors to Protest State’s ‘lack of concern’


         Doctors and nurses are now  getting out of their own self-imposed moral enslavement. Rather they are now forced to do so, as their lives and deteriorating working environment are becoming impossible to be in. One cannot burn himself in a furnace for eternity, for the well-being of others, especially if others are not concerned.

      The incidents at few places are just a tip of the iceberg. Covid has helped doctors to bring forth their plight. Doctors and nurses not paid for months in some Delhi Hospitals.  Doctors openly ridiculed and scolded by Administrators for no fault of theirs. Even a doctor lynched by mob in Assam and many assaulted at other places. Hospitals vandalized indicate that there is danger lurking for doctors everywhere. Most sad part is that, there are no firm administrative hands to deal with the menace.

     Clearly Well being of doctors and nurses is not being taken care of. They are being used as dispensable disposables. Such system, which is based on exploitation of the health workers, is becoming fast unsustainable. If apathy towards their genuine problems continues, negative attitude towards doctor and nurses persists,  it will kill the empathy towards patients as well.

 Overall, a complex scenario for doctors: There is increasing discontentment amongst doctors because of this complex and punishing system. They are bound by so many factors that they finally end up at the receiving end all the time. They are under Hippocratic oath and therefore expected to work with very high morality, goodwill and kindness for the sufferings of mankind and dying patients.  They are also supposed to maintain meticulous documentation and also supposed to work under norms of  medical industry. They are supposed to see large number of patients with fewer staff and nursing support while still giving excellent care in these circumstances. And if these were not enough, the fear of courts and medico-legal cases, verbal threats, abuses, and physical assaults and show of distrust by patient and relatives further makes working difficult. Additionally there may be bullying by certain administrative systems at places, who use pressure tactics to get their own way.

Government doctors in Kerala to boycott additional duties

    The Kerala Government Medical Officers’ Association (KGMOA) has declared that government doctors will stay away from all additional duties from Thursday, in protest against the government’s apparent lack of concern about the plight of health-care workers who are overworked and fatigued, fighting on the front lines for the past nine months.

  The KGMOA has, however, made it clear that while declaring non-cooperation, COVID-19 care and disease containment activities will not be disrupted.

In a statement issued here, the KGMOA said that apart from ignoring the KGMOA’s repeated demand for deploying additional human resources in COVID-19 care activities, the government’s decision to take away the leave given to health-care workers after continuous COVID-19 duty was something that defied all principles of fairness. This was totally unacceptable, the KGMOA said here.

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Penal Servitude for Doctors, Nurses- Administrators Delight


                         Life for health care professionals like  doctors and nurses is hard in present era, right from getting into medical college, passing the exams, gaining experience, work under new imposed legal environment, with  over-regulation and under the moral burden of over-expectations of society. The benefit of these difficult situation is reaped to the maximum by administrators and overpowering medical industry.

            Despite working amid of a national emergency in Covid-times, the meagre salaries of hundreds of doctor and nurses are not paid for months in Hindu Rao Hospital, Delhi

         Ironically where doctors are punished for small genuine mistakes or even poor prognosis during  medical treatment, the blunders of health  administrators are taken as trivial issues.  More ruthlessness, cunningness or cruelty towards health care workers is possibly becoming an appreciated quality of health administrators.  Why no punishment for the administrators for such blunders?

     Consequently, with no support from society, to whom they serve, doctor and nurses gradually are pushed to a penal servitude. If this is regarded as normal in present era, anyone would wonder, what does slavery constitute?

   No salaries  for doctors for four months

The doctors alleged negligence and apathy on part of the government and said that they were unable to run their basic errands and accomplish their daily routine due to non-payment of salaries.

  Irked over non-payment of salaries for over four months in a row, doctors at Delhi’s Hindu Rao Hospital announced that beginning Saturday, October 10, they would stop attending to patients including those suffering from Covid-19. Hindu Rao Hospital, the largest municipal hospital in Delhi with 900 beds, is currently a dedicated Covid-19 facility.The doctors alleged negligence and apathy on part of the government and said that they were unable to run their basic errands and accomplish their daily routine due to being unpaid for months.Abhimanyu Sardana, President of the Resident Doctors’ Association (RDA) of the hospital, said that several letters and reminders had been sent to Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal regarding the issue faced by the doctors, who are frontline warriors at the Covid-19 dedicated facility. “Don’t ignore the basic needs and rights of doctors,” wrote the RDA-Hindu Rao.

            Be it any circumstances like working without any facilities, poor infrastructure, non-availability of drugs, inhuman duties hours over 48-72 hours or poor pay, the administrators would say, “you are a doctor, it is your moral responsibility.”  Armchair preachers and administrators will always remind them of moral duties, but easily forget their own.

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Moral Dilemma: Should Doctors Stop Work-if unpaid?


         From the very beginning of medical career, certain phrases are repeated to doctors and become ingrained in their memory. Be it any circumstances like working without any facilities, poor infrastructure, non-availability of drugs, inhuman duties hours over 48-72 hours or poor pay, the administrators would say, “you are a doctor, it is your moral responsibility.”  Slowly doctors will adjust, keep on working and take hardship as part of their life. Armchair preachers and administrators will always remind them of moral duties, but easily forget their own.

        Humbled by the nature of profession and blunted  retaliation reflexes due to hard training and enormous studies, gradually they become moral slaves to themselves. Enlightened people will understand the situation as attaining higher  level of hierarchy.

      All the problems are taken as  part of “Routine Life of a Doctor.”   The long  Struggle to become a doctor, slogging in wards to learn and earn degrees, work in inhuman conditions, listen to endless abuses, tolerate the false media criticism, dragged in courts for alleged negligence, work with fear of physical assaults, work without proper infrastructure and manpower, endangering their own lives, exploited by medical  industry and administrators, poorly paid and  still not respected.   

          As doctors have not retaliated to deterioration, adapted  well to the slavery, situation is worsening. A  large hospital has not paid salaries to doctors for three months. Now  there is a moral dilemma for doctors: whether to continue work  or not?

Till society understands the concealed sense of enslavement that remains hidden, while performing these duties, the suffering of the profession will not end.  A problem that is clearly visible to every one,  but not admitted till now,  is in itself an evidence for a difficult scenario to be implemented. 

     Apart from moral dilemma, doctors will worry about legal implications. In present era,  amid maze of legal complexities, dilemmas are  unending. Among all such complexities, they have to worry about patients also.

    A strange situation, where thousands are being paid sitting at home,  The real warriors are unpaid.   Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

The resident doctors of Hindu Rao Hospital: indefinite strike from October 5 considering strictly ‘no pay no work’ 

NEW DELHI:  The resident doctors of Hindu Rao Hospital, the biggest medical facility under the North Delhi Municipal Corporation, will be staging an agitation against the administration due to their failure of paying the salaries of the healthcare workers over the past three months, said the president of the doctor’s body Abhimanyu Sardana.

The RDA of the hospital, which is also a dedicated Covid-19 facility, has decided to go on an indefinite strike from October 5 considering strictly ‘no pay no work’. However, essential services won’t be affected.


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Chilling Story: Surgery that Killed the Surgeon Himself


Doctor' suicide or murder by media trial

        Aspiring doctors, especially those who spend millions and golden years of life to become doctors, should know the reality of present era. How cruel the society has become towards doctors.

      Struggling to become a doctor, slogging in wards to learn and earn degrees, work in inhuman conditions, listen to endless abuses, tolerate the false media criticism, dragged in courts for alleged negligence, work with fear of physical assaults, work without proper infrastructure and manpower, endangering their own lives, exploited by medical  industry and administrators, poorly paid and  still not respected.    Arm chair preachers would just say “yes, as a doctor, they should do it as moral duty.”

         Not only corona virus, but society may also drive doctors to death.

    The consequence and reverberations of the poor prognosis landed on the doctor, subsequent to the death of the patient.  Media and celebrities usually   have proudly   projected on screen and television that it is right to be disrespectful towards doctors. They have made it appear correct to masses that doctors  be beaten and assaulted, in case there are unexpected results or in case of dissatisfaction. But such  news is viewed by medical community anxiously and is definitely a poor advertisement for younger generation to take medicine as profession. As incidents are widely publicized and masses following their “Reel Heroes” depicting violence against the doctor is seen as a routine and looked as an   easily do-able  adventure  due to  non-willingness of  authorities to take stringent action.

Kerala: Doctor ends life, medical fraternity blames ‘social media trial’

In a tragic incident, a young doctor from Kerala has died by suicide, reportedly after facing allegations of negligence following the death of a patient in his clinic.

Dr Anoop Krishnan, an Orthopedic Surgeon who used to run Anoop Ortho Care Hospital in Kollam was found hanging inside his house on Thursday. He had also cut his vein before hanging himself. The young medic had also inscribed the word ‘sorry’ with his blood inside the bathroom before he took the extreme step.

The 35-year-old was reportedly under stress for days after a 7-year-old girl who he had operated in his clinic died due to some complications.

The girl who also had a heart condition was admitted to Anoop Ortho Care Hospital for a surgery to fix a bent on her leg. Due to the girl’s heart condition, many others had reportedly declined to perform the surgical procedure.

Following the death of the patient, her relatives had filed a complaint against Dr. Anoop for negligence, alleging that an error in giving anesthesia caused the death. There were also protests outside the hospital by the relatives of the girl and an alleged smear campaign online against Dr. Anoop and his family. This, according to people who knew him had affected the young doctor who had made a reputation as one of the best orthopedic surgeons in the city.

Police said they are yet to ascertain whether the suicide was directly linked to the patient’s death.

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Covid effect: Reasons for costly oxygen


 

Oxygen has been a essential lifesaving therapy for covid patients. As large numbers require oxygen for prolonged periods because of post covid lung damage, the requirement has increased manifold. So it is in short supply and there is no dearth of people want to monetize the need. There are multiple reasons of shortage.

 The Indian express explains

   The delay in transportation of oxygen to dealers, conversion into cylinders and supply to hospitals can get long if even a tiny link in the supply chain falters.  

As Covid-19 sweeps across the country, urban and rural areas alike face an unprecedented spike in oxygen use. Around 3-5 per cent (over 50,000) of active Covid-19 cases in India have lung tissues damaged enough by the virus to require external oxygen support.

Since March, medical oxygen demand has grown from 750-800 to over 2,500 metric tonnes, and now, hospitals are struggling.

The supply 

In an ideal scenario, it takes 3-5 days for oxygen to journey from a manufacturer to a patient’s bed. But delay in transportation to dealers, conversion into cylinders and supply to hospitals can take longer if even a tiny link in the supply chain falters.

India’s big oxygen manufacturers, such as Inox Air Products, Linde India, Goyal MG Gases, National oxygen, use cryogenic distillation technique to compress air, feed it into distillation columns and get liquid oxygen. It has 99.5 per cent purity. This process, an official from Inox said, can take two-and-half-days.

The liquid oxygen is filled into special cryogenic transport tankers that maintain -180 degree centigrade temperature to travel to smaller plants in hinterlands, where liquid oxygen is converted into gaseous form, fed into cylinders and transported to the final destination – hospitals.

India has the capacity to produce 6,900 metric ton of liquid oxygen daily, health secretary Rajesh Bhushan said in a media interaction. According to the All India Industrial Gases Manufacturers’ Association (AIIGMA), over 2,500 tonne is being directed towards hospitals, most consumed by coronavirus patients, and another 2,000-2,300 tonne is industrial requirement each day. So if India is not exhausting its capacity of 6,900 metric tonnes, why is oxygen suddenly a concern?

Logistics

Medical oxygen demand has grown threefold in six months. “The issue is not of supply, it is of transportation and storage,” says health secretary Dr Pradeep Vyas, Maharashtra, which produces one-fifth of India’s oxygen capacity.

As demand surges, logistics are falling short. India has roughly 1,200-1,500 tankers for transport. Before the pandemic, the tankers were enough, but now they are difficult to hire and cost more.

Inox is the biggest manufacturer of liquid oxygen in India, with capacity of 1,911 metric tonnes per day. It currently supplies 1,400 tonnes, and has 550 transport tanks and 600 drivers to supply to 800 hospitals across India. But this may soon fall short.

It can take 5-6 days, for instance, for oxygen to travel from Inox Pune plant to Osmanabad, where a dearth of oxygen has emerged. The Centre is now working to utilise nitrogen tankers to transport oxygen. In just Maharashtra, 10 more tankers have been roped in.

Then there is the problem of storing this huge quantity of oxygen, says Saket Tiku, president of AIIGMA. Most rural hospitals do not have oxygen tanks as the need never arose before. A critical Covid-19 patient can need 30-60 litres of oxygen in a minute. One cylinder can run out in 15 minutes to an hour, depending on oxygen directed to patients.

States are looking at alternatives, from buying extra dura and jumbo cylinders to installing oxygen tanks as buffer stock. Inox has got the contract to fix 64 jumbo tanks across Covid hospitals to store 4 lakh litres.

Several states have also begun construction of oxygen generation plants that convert air into oxygen, and provide 93.5 per cent purity. But this construction will take months. The AIIGMA states that across India, 500 oxygen plants are in the process of construction, of which two major ones will be in Pune (Maharashtra) and Modinagar (Gujarat).

The price rise

Oxygen is generally quite cheap, but suddenly it has become expensive. A cylinder that would earlier cost Rs 100-150 now costs Rs 500-700 for refilling. With this, hoarding has begun. Fearful of not getting a Covid bed in hospital, people are keeping oxygen cylinders at home.

Before the pandemic, it would cost Rs 1.5-2 to refill a cubic metre of oxygen. But the cost of logistics has risen, so now Delhi will find refilling costs Rs 10-15 per cubic metre, and Mumbai Rs 15 per cubic metre. The government has fixed the cost of refilling at Rs 17.49 per cubic metre.

Several private hospitals charge patients Rs 1,500-3,000 for oxygen per day. “Based on our analysis, oxygen cost cannot exceed Rs 300-400 per patient per day in a hospital,” said Dr Sudhakar Shinde, IAS officer in-charge of fixing price cap for hospitals.

The industrial sector is bearing the brunt too. Requirement for oxygen had dipped to 250 metric tonne per day in March after lockdown. As restrictions were lifted, industries restarted work. Now, the industrial requirement is at 2,00-2,500 metric tonne. But there is limited supply.

Madhya Pradesh relied on Maharashtra and Gujarat for oxygen – as supplies from these states reduced, it has turned to Chhattisgarh for supply. In some states like Maharashtra, only 20 per cent oxygen produced can be directed for industrial purposes, rest are reserved for medical use.

What government is doing

There is also the wastage of oxygen – mild cases who don’t need it are put on oxygen support, sometimes leakages are reported from oxygen pipelines. An expert committee under MoHFW has fixed oxygen supply to 40 litres in intensive care units and 15 litre per minute in normal ward per patient per minute.

It has advised to monitor patients on oxygen support daily, and only put those with oxygen saturation levels below 94 on oxygen support. As per the committee, 20 out of 100 patients turn symptomatic and three of them critical. This is the pool that may require oxygen.

In Numbers 

India’s per day oxygen production capacity: 6,900 metric tonne

Current requirement: Over 2,500 metric tonne

Oxygen Transport tankers: 1,200-1,500

Active Covid cases: 9.75 lakh

On oxygen: 5.8%

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90 doctors in Maharashtra resigned due to harassment by administration


      

     

      Unparalleled sacrifice by medical community during pandemic  has not  resulted in any enhancement of  respect or prestige to the medical  profession. It was not enough  to stop physical or verbal assaults, legal or financial  exploitation. It was not sufficient  to alter the course of oppression  by administrators or moral blackmail by society. Sadly it is getting more worse. Doctors and nurse have been reduced to sacrificial lambs, that are easily slayed, when administrators tend  to put  themselves on high moral  pedestals. 

Financial and legal complexities have been the major side effects of modern medicine, especially for doctors. They are facing  complex  environment,  which are beyond their control. Besides financial and legal complexities, moral dilemmas, facing verbal and physical assaults are creating  complex working conditions. But if doctors are not able to work, who will be the sufferer, does not need an Einstein brain  to guess. Criticized  by administrators despite their sacrifice, media insults are adding to their disillusionment and possibly  a withdrawal response.

90 doctors in Maharashtra  resigned  due to harassment by administration

Over 90 gazetted medical officers posted in Yavatmal district of Maharashtra have resigned today from their service allegedly due to consistent harassment by the administration and District Collector MD Singh. 

These doctors have been serving at the civil hospital, sub-district and rural hospitals and primary health centres in various capacities. 

In a letter written to the government today, Dr Rajesh Gaikwad and Dr Pramod Rakshamwar, both office bearers of the Maharashtra Association Of Government Medical Officers, says, “Despite marathon efforts by the doctors throughout the pandemic, administrative officers and DM is mistreating the doctors which has led to resentment among entire fraternity.”

     Such  incidents  are not only  painful to the medical fraternity but also expose the hypocritical  attitude of the administrators as well as  the insensitive approach of society towards health care workers, although everyone expects doctors and nurses to be sensitive towards everyone else. Such indifferent   attitude demoralizes and causes deep discouragement to the front line doctor and nurses, but sadly remains a routine business for administrators. The pain of being  treated like a dispensable disposables remains as  a deep hurt within.

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MCI to NMC: Change of Medical Education Regulator


Some drastic regulation is need of the hour, of the  chaotic and non-uniform medical education system of India. Besides an urgent need for  better standards, uniformity in  standards of medical education and  fee structure is desirable. National Medical Commission Act 2019  has been passed. NMC has replaced MCI. But attainment of desired goals will still  depend upon, how well the future plans are implemented. The  mammoth system needs an herculean overall and honest policy changes from the roots.

The National Medical Commission (NMC), a new body, will function as the country’s top regulator of medical education from Friday, a day after the Centre dissolved the Board of Governors—Medical Council of India (BoG-MCI) through a gazette notification.

The setting up of NMC was a government move to bring reforms in the medical education sector, especially aimed at replacing the MCI, which was tainted by corruption.

The government had dissolved the MCI in 2018 following the corruption charges and replaced it with a BoG, which was chaired by Dr VK Paul, member (health), Niti Aayog.

The body was functioning under the Indian Medical Council (IMC) Act, 1956.

“The BoG-MCI has been dissolved and the NMC replaced it with effect from Friday,” said Dr Paul.

The IMC Act stands repealed, and has been replaced by The NMC Act that came into existence on August 8, 2019.

“Indian Medical Council Act, 1956 (102 of 1956) is hereby repealed with effect from September 25. The BoG appointed under section 3A of the Indian Medical Council Act, 1956 (102 of 1956) in supersession of the MCI constituted under sub-section (1) of section 3 of the said Act shall stand dissolved,” stated the gazette notification issued by the Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoH&FW).

Professor Suresh Chandra Sharma, former head of the ear nose throat (ENT) department at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, has been appointed as the chairman of the NMC.

Dr Sharma had retired from AIIMS in January and was selected by a seven-member search committee for the post from 300-odd applications received from across the country. He was also one of the five short-listed candidates for the post of director, AIIMS, New Delhi, after the then director, Dr MC Misra, had retired in 2017.

Dr Rakesh Kumar Vats, secretary general, BoG-MCI, has been appointed as the secretary of the NMC by the Appointments Committee of Cabinet (ACC).

The NMC will have four separate autonomous boards: under-graduate medical education, post-graduate medical education, medical assessment and rating and ethics and medical registration.

The common final year Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) examination will now be known as the National Exit Test (NEXT), according to the new medical education structure under the NMC.

NEXT will act as licentiate examination to practice medicine, the criteria for admission to post-graduate (PG) medical courses, and also for screening of foreign medical graduates.

Besides, the National Eligibility and Entrance Test (NEET), NEXT will also be applicable to institutes of national importance such as all the AIIMS in a bid to ensure a common standard in the medical education sector in the country.

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Story of Moral slaves: How Doctors bear full brunt #Covid


              Struggling to become a doctor, slogging in wards to learn and earn degrees, work in inhuman conditions, listen to endless abuses, tolerate the false media criticism, dragged in courts for alleged negligence, work with fear of physical assaults, work without proper infrastructure and manpower, endangering their own lives, exploited by medical  industry and administrators, poorly paid and  still not respected.    Arm chair preachers would just say “yes, as a doctor, they should do it as moral duty.”

             The Indian Express has been wise enough and has been able to  express the situation to some extent, which is just tip of the iceberg.

             Low pay and long hours, doctors battle more than just Covid-19.

 Maharashtra estimates it needs 19,752 doctors, nurses and paramedics to fight Covid-19. As on September 15, 12,574 of the posts were vacant. Dr Rajesh Salagare is the only doctor at Raigad rural hospital since March. (Express photo by Tabassum Barnagarwala) Chest physician Dr Pravin Dumne has just done his rounds of the ICU at Osmanabad Civil Hospital and is now fielding queries from anxious relatives. Two hours into the PPE, he is drenched in sweat, with 22 hours more to go in his shift. Dumne has 150 Covid-19 patients under him. Since May, he hasn’t been able to take any break except for 12 days when he himself contracted the virus. Norms mandate one doctor per 10 ICU patients, Dumne is handling five times that. “There are times when multiple patients are critical and I can’t be everywhere. I feel helpless. We are losing lives,” he adds. As another relative complains about the lack of cleanliness in a ward, Dumne says, “I may quit government service once the pandemic is over.” Dumne isn’t the only one feeling the unequal load as coronavirus cases surge in Maharashtra, particularly its rural areas. The state estimates it needs 19,752 doctors, nurses and paramedics to fight Covid-19. As on September 15, 12,574 of the posts were vacant. Of the 1,700 Class I doctor posts (including specialists) the Public Health Department needs to fill, like Dumne’s, only 538 are filled. In May, Maharashtra was forced to ask Kerala for help. Forty specialist doctors came to Mumbai on a bus, to handle critical patient load until July. The shortage is even more intense in rural areas, where urgent advertisements by the government for specialists have yielded little response. In rural Nagpur, as many as 93.6% posts are vacant, followed by Thane at 79%. The last permanent posting in Osmanabad, an aspirational district under NITI Aayog, was three years ago. It needs 150 nurses and 40 doctors. The state government has been deputing Ayush doctors to civil hospitals. “Not all of them can handle serious patients,” Dumne points out. He and Dr Tanaji Lakal are the only two specialist doctors for Covid patients at Osmanabad Civil Hospital. Dumne was moved here from the PHC at Samudrawani village, following the pandemic. Dumne and Lakal alternate working for 24 hours continuously followed by one day off. In July, when Dumne got the coronavirus, he had to join back within 12 days, instead of the minimum 14. The number game In Raigad, 400 km away, Dr Rajesh Salagare has been the only doctor handling the entire rural hospital since March. The three other doctor posts at the hospital have been vacant since 2018. The previous night he was called for a delivery at 2 am; this morning, he was back on OPD duty at 9. “I am just an Ayush doctor. If something goes wrong, I will be held responsible,” he worries. It’s not just the long hours that deter doctors from rural duty. A government MBBS doctor in rural areas is paid Rs 60,000 per month and is expected to be on call 24 hours, their counterparts in Navi Mumbai get Rs 1.25 lakh, and in Mumbai and Thane, Rs 80,000 per month. Navi Mumbai, Thane and Mumbai mandate eight hours on Covid duty at a time, apart from providing hotel accommodation. As a chest physician, Dumne could earn up to Rs 2 lakh in urban areas, instead of the Rs 60,000 he gets now. His August salary came only a few days ago. The 100-bed Covid facility in Ratnagiri depends on Ayush doctors from nearby PHCs. One such doctor, who requested anonymity, says he sees over hundred suspected cases a day. He got his pending salary of Rs 40,000 for four months, till July, only a few days ago. “Everyone calls us corona warriors, but look at how we are treated.” Dr Pravin Dumne (in white) at Osmanabad Civil Hospital. (Express Photo: Tabassum Barnagarwala) An administrative officer at Ratnagiri Civil hospital, who is waiting for his pay since July, shows text messages exchanged with seniors. “If the government doesn’t respect us, why will a doctor want to work here?” he says. Ratnagiri Civil Surgeon Dr Ashok Bolde says the delay in salaries is on the part of the National Health Mission’s state office. Dr Sadhana Tayade, Director of the Directorate of Health Services, however, says, “Salaries are paid on time to doctors.” On why the poor response to advertisements, she says it is because “doctors are scared to work in Covid wards”. The government has begun tele-ICU services to plug the gap of specialists in rural hospitals of Bhiwandi, Aurangabad, Jalna and Solapur. Physicians in another city monitor ICU readings of patients in rural hospitals and call up on-duty doctors to direct treatment protocol. But tele-ICU has not reached every rural hospital, nor can it help everyone.          Next younger generation of aspiring doctors, who is  witnessing to the cruelty shown towards health staff, may be forced to think about their decisions to become doctors.

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Dead Body swap # Covid; unprecedented stress- Bizarre mistakes


Two incidents of dead body swaps have happened in last few months. Strangely two mistakes out of   correct millions  are enough to label hospitals, doctors  or health systems  as  callous. Covid times are  toughest times for health care staff and hospitals as well.

   Definitely it is sad and  painful  incident. Without doubt, swapping bodies and causing distress to relatives is really shocking.  There will be a  demand for exemplary  punishment to  health  care workers involved. There is a little doubt that they will meet the stringent punishment, as this is regarded as unpardonable, given the involvement of health care staff.

  But is that the right way? Will chopping the hands, that were trying to rescue, is of help?

          No one will like to see, how health workers have been  stressed. Under the unprecedented circumstances, how fewer number of frontline workers have been battling the pandemic.

      Armchair preachers cannot imagine the stress and the hard work, these   warriors are burdened with. There can be multiple ways to look at these unforeseen mistakes.

  1. Punish the health workers, make an example by taking away their jobs. So everyone  will learn.
  2. Check the faults in the system, make the whole system fool-proof by learning from the mistakes, so it becomes more robust with times to come.
  3. Counselling   of the personnel involved along with improving the system.
  4. Understand the stress and circumstances of front line workers and improving their working conditions, so as to reduce their  burden.
  5. Check the past record, if someone has done thousands right things, do not hang him for a single error, especially intoday’s unprecedented circumstances.  

Most desirable  at such crucial times will be encouragement and psychological support to front line workers.

Bodies swapped at private hospital in Delhi,

NEW DELHI: A private hospital in southwest Delhi’s Dwarka committed a grave error by handing over the body of a Christian woman to the family of a Covid-positive Hindu woman. The 69-year-old woman, Garikapati Parisuddam, was not infected with the novel coronavirus and had passed away on Monday morning.

AIIMS sacks one, suspends another for swapping of dead bodies

An ambulance with four corpses – including that of Anjum B – left from the hospital on Tuesday afternoon. Three of the persons who had died were Hindu and were taken to a crematorium before the van left for the ITO burial ground.

  Just  delivering professional death sentence for  single, system errors  or unforeseen mistakes will have  future implications.  It is like chopping the hands,  that were trying to help.

           As Corona has unmasked the real risk to health workers and society has dealt with heath workers shabbily. Next younger generation of aspiring doctors, who is a witness to the cruelty shown towards health staff, may be forced to think about their decisions to become health workers. Possibly the administrators need to ponder now, who will treat people  in next pandemic.

  Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

   25 factors- why health care is expensive

   REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

Doctor’s death: saved uncountable lives- still not counted


In an era, where Reel Heroes are worshipped and Real Heroes are not    counted even after sacrificing their lives, is an unfortunate  and disheartening for  the whole community of doctors and nurses. It is surprising that  doctors, who saved uncountable lives, did not move the administrators enough  to get them counted.  Such  incidents  are not only  painful to the medical fraternity but also expose the hypocritical  attitude of the administrators as well as  the insensitive approach of society towards health care workers, although everyone expects doctors and nurses to be sensitive towards everyone else. Such indifferent   attitude demoralizes and causes deep discouragement to the front line doctor and nurses, but sadly remains a routine business for administrators. The pain of being  treated like a dispensable disposable remains as  a deep hurt within.

         But at the same time, mere tokenism as an expression of concern is also not desirable. What is really required is a sincere effort to reduce the mortality of health care workers, to provide them better working conditions. An honest effort to find the cause of mortality among doctors and reducing it, help to the families of the health care workers is required. Due acknowledgement and true  respect to their sacrifice  is expected from civilized society.

“382 Doctors Died Of Covid”: Medical Body Says Centre “Abandoning” Heroes

Indian Medical Association has shown its displeasure over  the Government  statement on coronavirus in parliament, which had no word on the doctors who died in the line of duty, and the  statement that the Centre had no data as health is a state subject.  Accusing the government of “indifference”, “abdication” and “abandonment of heroes”, the country’s top body of medical practitioners said in such a circumstance, the government “loses the moral authority to administer the Epidemic Act 1897 and the Disaster Management Act”.

So far, 382 doctors have died of coronavirus, the IMA said. In the list it released, the youngest doctor to lose his life was 27 years old and the oldest was 85.

But while acknowledging the contribution of healthcare workers during the pandemic, the health minister made no mention of the medical professionals lost to the disease, the IMA said.  

“To feign that this information doesn’t merit the attention of the nation is abominable,” the IMA statement read. “It appears that they are dispensable. No nation has lost as many doctors and health care workers like India,” the statement added.

The IMA pointed to Union minister Ashwini Kumar Choubey’s statement that the Union government does not have any compensation data as public health and hospitals comes under the states.

“This amounts to abdication of duty and abandonment of the national heroes who have stood up for our people. IMA finds it strange that after having formulated an unfriendly partial insurance scheme for the bereaved families to struggle with the ignominy of the Government disowning them altogether stares at them,” the statement read.

Such a circumstance also exposes the “hypocrisy of calling them corona warriors on one hand and denying them and their families the status and benefits of martyrdom,” the IMA said.

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