Man Jailed for Abusing Lady Doctor


         In present era,  most of the time, a lenient view is taken  against assault of doctors on the grounds of  emotional circumstances  of relatives and sympathy towards patients, even in cases of blatant injustice imparted towards doctors and nurses. Not   infrequently, assaults of doctors are taken as routine incidents committed under disguise of perceived negligence and sympathy towards patients. The culprits are able to commonly get away with it.

   But this businessman who abused a lady doctor has not been proved to be lucky, at least till this time. He was handed over a jail term of 6 months. Rightly so, courts need to aim at imparting justice and not judge on the basis of projected disturbed emotional state.

         Doctors have become punching bags for all the malaise prevalent in the system. A failing system which is unable to provide health to the people and security to doctors. The rickety system hides behind their hard working doctors and presents them as punching bags. The impunity with which attendant easily and brutally assault doctors is really appalling, should be shameful to law enforcing agencies.

Man gets six-month jail for abusing lady doctor

            Role of media, celebrities, film stars and prominent personalities in spreading the hatred against the medical profession and creating an environment of mistrust is unpardonable. They project   single stray incident   as an example and portray poor image of medical profession as generalization just to earn money and fame for themselves. Doctors need to be careful and remain careful about saving themselves from verbal, physical as well as legal assaults.

  Man gets six-month jail for abusing lady doctor

The incident had taken place on 23 Nov 2017 when Rohinton Umarigar, who was at the Parsi General Hospital for his mother’s treatment used abusive language with the woman doctor who was in charge of the ICU

A Girgaum magistrate court refused leniency to a 52-year-old who used foul language with a woman doctor in 2017 and sentenced him to six months of simple imprisonment. It stated that unwarranted leniency to him would send a wrong signal to society and that he had used unparliamentary language to insult the dignity of a woman.

The incident had taken place on November 23, 2017, when the man, Rohington Umarigar, was at the Parsi General Hospital where his mother was undergoing treatment. He used abusive language with the woman doctor who was in charge of the ICU.

The Nepean Sea Road resident had sought leniency and requested that the court release him by imposing a minimum fine and on a bond of good behaviour. He told the court that he was the only breadwinner of his family. Umarigar’s advocate told the court that the incident occurred at the spur of the moment when his mother was ill. The court said the punishment under Sec 509 of the IPC (word, gesture, act intended to outrage modesty of a woman) was enhanced by the legislation in 2013 looking at the time and seriousness of offences committed against the modesty of women. The court noted that Umarigar had misbehaved a second time with the doctor, which means it was intentional.

“Whenever such type of offence is committed against women, it is against their right to sexual integrity, dignity. It is linked to their right to privacy…in the present matter also, the accused has used unparliamentary words to insult the dignity of woman. He is in his 50s and knows the consequences of his act,” Magistrate Nadeem A Patel said. The court further said that while enhancing the punishment, it was the intention of the legislature to penalize the offence of outraging a woman’s dignity, either physically or verbally. Therefore, in such cases, unwarranted leniency shown will send a wrong message to society. It also imposed a fine of Rs 1,000 on the man.

The man had claimed that he had made a complaint to the hospital management against the doctor for negligence and that this was a counter-complaint. The court refused to accept this defence. It said that even for the sake of argument if it were to be assumed that she had been negligent in her own duty, it did not give him the right to abuse a lady doctor. It relied on the testimony of the victim, as well as her three colleagues at the hospital who testified about the incident.

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   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

 Sow Muskmelon-Deserve/Expect Apple? #NEET-Medical-seats filled  with rock-bottom scores


Doctors are just as offshoots of a tree called as society. They essentially are the same as rest of the society. It is a specialized branch of tree which helps other offshoots of tree to save others. As part of same tree, they resemble the parent society, of which they are part. Society needs to choose and nurture a force of doctors carefully with an aim to combat for safety of its own people.

      Apple tree will have apples and musk melons plant will grow muskmelons only. One should not expect apples to grow on muskmelon stem. If society has failed to demand for a good and robust system, failed to save them, it should not rue scarcity of good doctors. Merit based cheap good medical education system is the need of the society. This is in interest of society to nurture good doctors for its own safety.

Therefore the quality of doctors who survive and flourish in such system will be a natural consequence of how society chooses and nurtures the best for themselves.

        Imagine, an opportunity is available to a patient, to decide the doctor as based on his route or marks for entry into medical college. Whether patient will like to get treated by a doctor, who   secured 20% marks, 30 % marks or 60% marks or 80% marks for medical college.  Even   an illiterate person can answer that well. But strangely for selection of doctors, rules were framed so as to dilute the merit to the minimum possible. So that a candidate who scores 15-20 % marks also becomes eligible to become a doctor. What is the need to dilute and shortlist around half a million for few thousand seats? Answer to that is simple.  To select and find only those students from millions, who can pay millions to become doctors?  

   If the society continues to accept such below par practices, it has to introspect, whether it actually deserves to get good doctors. Paying the irrational fee of medical colleges may be unwise idea for the candidates, who are not from strong financial backgrounds. But at the same time unfortunately, it may be a compulsion and entrapment for students, who have entered the profession and there is no way  forward.  So children have to be careful while choosing medical careers from the beginning.

NEET Tail-Enders Jump Queue, Grab Medical Seats

    NEET Tail-enders Jump Queue, Grab Medical Seats

MUMBAI: MBBS aspirants who missed out in the initial rounds of seat allotment and pinned their hopes on vacant NRI quota seats have been bested by students at the tail end of the NEET qualifying list helped by NRI sponsors. Overnight, close to 152 aspirants, many of them with ranks in six digits, have submitted documents, including a certificate from the consulate concerned, to prove that their education will be sponsored by an Indian based abroad. Aspirants with much higher scores, who were banking on the addition of vacant NRI seats to the relatively cheaper management quota — the fee differential can be as much as Rs 25 lakh-35 lakh — have been done in by a minor clause in the fingerprint. A medical college in Maharashtra has, in fact, already allotted a seat to a NEET qualifier placed 267th from the bottom in a list stretching into several lakhs. When registration for the all-India mop-up round began on March 10, several Indian candidates had applied to convert to NRI status. The medical counselling committee gave such students time from noon on March 11 to 6pm the next day to change their nationality from Indian to NRI. However, candidates wrote to the NMC asking for their nationality to be converted in the last leg of the admission process, presumably after all other options to secure a seat had been exhausted. “The NMC was forced to open that window. According to a 2017 Supreme Court judgment, a candidate can change his or her nationality at any point,” said Dr Pravin Shingare, former head of the Directorate of Medical Education and Research.  NRI seats, which cost Rs 40 lakh-60 lakh per year — 4-5 times more than those in the management quota — and had no takers until last week, were now suddenly in demand and filled by candidates with rock-bottom scores. At Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences, Loni (Maharashtra), the last management seat was filled by rank 83,817 while the last NRI seat went to rank 8,72,911. At Sri Devaraj Urs Medical College, Kolar, the last management seat was allotted to rank 86,416 and its last NRI seat to rank 8,76,357. This scenario has played out in medical institutes across the country. Rank holder 71,474 had named MGM College as his first choice in the mop-up round. He didn’t get a seat, but a candidate more than 8 lakh ranks below at 8,73,286 has got lucky, thanks to the clause which allows a student to abruptly change his/her nationality in the midst of the admission process. Hence, of the 19 vacant NRI seats at MGM that should have been converted to the general category, according to the NMC notification, not a single one eventually remained vacant.

           Our society fails to develops a robust system of choosing and nurturing good doctors and therefore itself responsible for decline in standards of medical profession. A famous axiom “as you sow so shall you reap” has an application to health system, Government and Public as well in this scenario, so people should not rue scarcity of good doctors.  

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

 21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

Lowering NEET Percentile- an Illusion of Merit


Overplayed narrative of fewer doctors in the country, rather than a system  for proper utilization is an effort to increase numbers of doctors. But this goal needs to be achieved with preserving quality of medical education. Almost all efforts to increase the number of doctors are associated on dilution of merit. Selling the medical seats is heading towards bubble burst, when despite declining demand for poor quality and expensive medical education, new private colleges being approved along with lowering merit to a dismal percentage.

     Future doctors getting admissions by scoring just 10-20 percent of marks, poor teacher student ratio, seats being awarded to highest bidder are few pointers to the poor quality of medical education. Few years back NEET percent system was changed to percentile and now the bar is lowered further, just to accommodate more ‘bidders’ with less marks, to be able to buy  medical seats.

    This potpourri portends to be a travesty of quality, not just of medical education but more seriously, of the quality of doctors. Allotment of medical seats is being left to the vagaries of populism and commercialism, through a false sense ‘the illusion of merit’ secured via NEET. Admission criteria whittled down to mere 10-20 percent, will result in an irreversible and regressive compromise with quality of doctors. Will patients approve such dizzying choice and at what cost?

        Going by selection of candidates as doctors, if given a choice, by which a patient will like to get treated? A candidate who scored 20 % marks or a person getting 60% or 80% marks.   NEET eligibility getting lower and a candidate getting around 20 % of marks may be able to secure a degree to treat patients.  What will be the deciding factor? The criteria as to why a person with 60% marks not getting a seat and another with 20% marks will be able to secure. It will depend upon, whether a candidate is able to pay the exorbitant fee or not. Present system and mechanism of admission permit and accept such huge variation! That strange equation is acceptable in lieu of money paid!

Govt cuts NEET-PG cutoff by 15 percentile

Govt cuts NEET-PG cutoff by 15 percentile

 In a move that is likely to boost uptake in vacant post-graduate medical seats and also improve availability of specialists in future, the health ministry has slashed the cutoff for NEET-PG 2021 by 15 percentile across all categories. The ministry issued a letter to the National Medical Commission on Saturday giving a go-ahead to the proposal. The revised qualifying cutoff now stands at 35 percentile for the general category, 30 percentile for persons with disabilities (PwD) general, 25 for SC/ST and OBC and 25 for PwD (SC/ST/OBC), the letter said. The reduction in the cut off percentile is expected to allow more MBBS passouts to apply for post-graduate courses, an official said.  “The move aims to prevent seat wastage. With this reduction in percentile, approximately 25,000 fresh candidates can participate in the mop-up round of the ongoing counselling,” a ministry official said. Nearly 8,000 post-graduate seats are still vacant despite two rounds each of all India and state counselling. “After due discussion and deliberations, it has been decided by the health ministry in consultation with NMC to reduce the cut off by 15 percentile across all categories…” medical counselling committee member-secretary  wrote in a letter to National Board of Examinations executive director . TOI has reviewed the letters. The move is also expected to fill a serious gap in the availability of specialists.  There remains a severe shortfall of over 76% in terms of specialists like surgeons, gynaecologists, physicians and paediatricians at community health centres. Against the requirement for existing infrastructure, there is a shortfall of 78.9% surgeons, 69.7% obstetricians & gynaecologists, 78.2% physicians and 78.2% paediatricians. The Centre has further directed NBE to declare the revised results and send data of the newly eligible candidates to the counselling committee

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

 21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

Unjustified Profiteering in Medical Education Pushing Indian Students to Ukraine


       The ongoing Russia- Ukraine conflict has generated a discussion about a sub-plot, which links to India’s medical education.  There have been reports that there are 18000 Indian medical students in Ukraine. People are wondering why Medical Students from India need to go to Ukraine for studying medicine. Answer is quite simple and does not need an Einstein Brain.  It is the steep fee that private medical colleges charge from students which is unjustified and beyond any logic. It just needs a sincere ‘Government Will’ to implement the justified fee for MBBS seats in private medical colleges in India. Medical colleges in Ukraine, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Bangladesh, Philippines and China have been benefitted because of the severe exploitation of medical students in India.

      It needs a sincere and honest assessment of the fee and expenditure of medical college and education rather than a permission for heavy profiteering. If honest calculations are carried out, the fee should not be more than one fifth of present rates, taking into account the hospital services expenditure.

What draws med students to Ukraine? Affordability

What draws med students to Ukraine? Affordability – Times of India

Why do Indian students go to Ukraine to pursue courses, especially MBBS? Because of affordability, says Manjula Naidu, proprietor of a firm that helps send students to Ukraine’s Bukovinian State Medical University. Usha Rani, an Anekal resident whose son is in first-year MBBS at Zaporizhzhia State Medical University, said she wouldn’t have sent him to Ukraine had she been able to pay nearly Rs 80 lakh for an MBBS course in Karnataka. Though Karnataka has more than 9,000 MBBS seats, government quota seats account for not even 40%, forcing many aspirants to opt for countries like Ukraine, Georgia and Kyrgyzstan. What students and their parents find attractive is the Rs 25-30 lakh package for the entire course. Besides there are consulting agencies to help them with loans and the medium of instruction is English.  On the other hand, the first fee slab for an MBBS seat in a government college is Rs 59,000 per year, followed by the second slab of government quota seats in private colleges (Rs 1.4 lakh per annum). The next fee slab is of private seats (management quota) in private colleges that varies from Rs 10 lakh to Rs 25 lakh a year. Even more expensive are the NRI quota seats and those in deemed universities.

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

     REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

     21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

     Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

Expensive Medical College  seat- Is it worth it?

Moral bankruptcy of administrators #unpaid doctors


     In an era when doctors are being punished for small mistakes or merely perceived negligence, the blunders committed by administrators are not even noticed. Doctors are not paid for four months and for protesting the same, they were given termination letters.  It seems that doctors need to live with blatant injustice all their lives.

 Any punishment for the  administrators for mismanagement? Looks impossible but punishment to the sufferers is on the cards.

     Medical students or aspiring doctors should be carefully watching the behaviour and cruelty by which doctors are governed, regulated and treated by administrators. Mere few words of respect and false lip service during Covid-pandemic  should not mask the real face of administrators, indifference of courts and harshness of Government towards medical profession. Choosing medical careers can land anyone into the situations, which are unimaginable in a civilized world.

    Doctors pleadings even for their rightful issues and routine problems are paid deaf and indifferent ears. It is disheartening to see that they receive apathetic attitude and dealt with stick or false assurances even for the issues which should have been solved automatically in routine even by average application of governance.

             It is discouraging for the whole medical fraternity to see that even the rightful is not being given what to expect the gratitude and respect.

         The indifferent behaviour has also unveiled the approach of  tokenism such as ‘mere lip service’  showing respect to corona warriors.

      The strong political and legal will is absent to solve Doctors’ problems.

 Unpaid doctors; Medical staff protest on- termination order?

New Delhi: Doctors, nurses and paramedical staff of East Delhi Municipal Corporation-run hospitals continued their protest on Thursday as well over non-payment of salaries for four months.
Meanwhile, an order issued by the medical superintendent of Swami Dayanand Hospital, Dr Rajni Khedwal, stated that services of all senior and junior resident doctors would be considered terminated from February 4 and fresh interviews would be conducted accordingly. The order also stated that all Diplomate of National Board (DNB) residents and contractual doctors would be marked absent.

“We all were there in the protest, none of us went for our duties. We have also asked the administration to speak on our behalf because they are too part of the hospital. Maybe the matter will be resolved tomorrow. Unless we get a concrete statement regarding salary, we will continue the protest,” said Dr Atul Jain, president of the hospital’s resident doctors’ association.

Meanwhile, EDMC commissioner Vikas Anand said that no order had been issued regarding the termination/suspension of the striking doctors’ services so far. The termination order is only for the DNB workers and for the rest of the medical staff, it is based on ‘no work no pay’ as per the SC rule, he clarified.

“The salaries will be provided at the earliest. We have a very good team of doctors at Swami Dayanand Hospital. The only request is that they should join back and resume services,” said the commissioner.


Anand also said that the salaries for the months of February and March would be paid on time. “EDMC is going through a financial crisis and even in such difficult times, the corporation is sensitive towards the interests of its employees. Their due arrears will be paid in the month of May as per the availability of the funds,” he added.

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

     REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

     21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

     Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons


Quack Menace: Infant loses glans in botched circumcision


Infant loses glans in botched circumcision done by quack

        In an era, when even licensed and qualified doctors are finding it difficult to practice medicine, it is strange that unqualified and unlicensed are having a field day. Why strict regulations do not apply to them, is beyond any reasoning and logic. If a medical facility or clinic is functional, it is difficult for the patient, especially in emergency, to check or even doubt its credentials. How such facilities are open, functional and thriving. Sadly our regulation is trying to regulate, who are already regulated. It is trying to punish those who are qualified and licensed, but turns a blind eye towards unlicensed and unqualified doctors.

     Such fake doctors own medical set ups, may conduct surgeries, sometimes run hospitals with little help from qualified doctors  and do procedures. Another problem is that they   promote fake rumours about genuinely qualified doctors and create a mist of mistrust to propagate their fake medical business.

A toddler has died Australia after circumcision

Quack Menace: Infant loses glans in botched circumcision

 The glans of an infant’s penis shrivelled and fell off after a quack tied a horse’s hair around it ‘to prevent bleeding’ after a ritual of circumcision. The child was rushed to hospital, where a surgery was performed to ensure that the baby will be able to urinate normally, but the boy has lost his glans.. A quack had conducted the religious ritual of circumcision on November 22, 2021, and tied a horse hair to the child’s penis. He then bandaged it and told the family to go home.

The child was born in October 2021. Ten days later, the family members noticed that the glans had come off along with the dressing. Families choose to get their male infants circumcised by neighbourhood quacks. This is not just unhygienic, but can lead to major complications as well. Other unhealthy practices like sprinkling ash on the wound after circumcision are also prevalent.

A toddler has died in Australia after circumcision

A toddler has died and his baby brother has required life-saving surgery in hospital after a medical procedure, understood to have been a circumcision, went horribly wrong in Perth’s south-east. The brothers were rushed to hospital in Armadale by family Tuesday evening following the surgeries. The West Australian reports a two-year-old boy was pronounced dead at the hospital’s emergency department. His infant brother – aged between seven and eight months – was rushed to Perth Children’s Hospital for emergency surgery.7NEWS reports he has since been discharged from hospital. WA Police have confirmed the toddler’s death is not being treated as suspicious. “It can be confirmed the boy underwent a medical procedure at a registered medical centre prior to his death,” a police spokeswoman said.

Circumcision is one of the oldest surgical procedures and one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in practice today. Descriptions of ritual circumcision span across cultures, and have been described in ancient Egyptian texts as well as the Old Testament. In the United States, circumcision is a commonly performed procedure. It is a relatively safe procedure with a low overall complication rate. Most complications are minor and can be managed easily. Though uncommon, complications of circumcision do represent a significant percentage of cases seen by paediatric urologists. Often they require surgical correction that results in a significant cost to the health care system. Severe complications are quite rare, but death has been reported as a result in some cases. A thorough and complete preoperative evaluation, focusing on bleeding history and birth history, is imperative. Proper selection of patients based on age and anatomic considerations as well as proper sterile surgical technique are critical to prevent future circumcision-related adverse events.

Complications of circumcision

Bleeding- Bleeding is the most commonly encountered complication of circumcision.

Infection, Insufficient Foreskin Removed, Excessive foreskin removed, Adhesions / Skin , Bridges, Inclusion Cysts, abnormal Healing

Meatitis, Meatal Stenosis, Urinary Retention, Phimosis, Chordee, Hypospadias, Epispadias

Urethrocutaneous Fistula, Necrosis of the Penis, Amputation of the Glans

Death—    death is an extremely unlikely complication of neonatal circumcision, but it has been reported.

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

     REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

     21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

     Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons


Doctors treating anarchic & lawless society # Doctor killed for perceived negligence


   In an act of revenge that took over two years, a doctor with a government hospital in Yavatmal – 650 km from Mumbai – was shot dead, allegedly by a family member of his patient who had died under the doctor’s supervision two years ago.

   Attacks and assaults on doctors is an indicator of a lawless, uncivilized society, poor governance and broken health system.  Unwillingness or failure of government to prevent such attacks on doctors will have deep ramifications on future of medical profession.  The impunity with which criminals can dare to take law into their hands and punish doctors instantly at will is a blatant disrespect to courts and judicial system. In absence of strict laws for protection of doctors, health care workers have become vulnerable to  assaults and revenge.

    Doctors have become punching bags for all the malaise prevalent in the system. A failing system which is unable to provide  health to the people and security to doctors. The rickety system hides behind their hard working doctors and presents them as punching bags. The impunity with which attendant easily and brutally assault doctors is really appalling, should be shameful to law enforcing agencies.

            Role of media, celebrities, film stars and prominent personalities in spreading the hatred against the medical profession and creating an environment of mistrust is unpardonable. They project   single stray incident   as an example and portray poor image of medical profession as generalization just to earn money and fame for themselves.

 Hence by selective projection the blame for deficiencies of inept system, powerful industry, inadequate infrastructure and poor outcomes of serious diseases is shifted conveniently to doctors, who are unable to retaliate to the powerful media machinery.   Role of doctor associations, parent institutes have been spineless and not encouraging.

        The demonstration of the cleft that separates doctors from the actual overpowering controlling medical industry and administrators is not given, in order to maintain the prejudice with its dangerous bias towards doctors, who are in forefront and are visible to public.  

Relatives shot and kill doctor for perceived negligence

Family members of the patient had alleged that it was due to the negligence of Dr Hanumant Dharmakare, medical officer at the R P Uttarwar Kutir Hospital, that their son Arbaz (20), who had met with a bike accident, died in May 2019.

The police are on the lookout for the main suspect, Aifaz Shaikh, the elder brother of Arbaz, who is believed to have shot the doctor.On January 11, Dharmakare was shot dead in broad daylight by an unidentified person on the Umarkhed – Pusad Road in Yavatmal. The police team found that the application concerned the death of his nephew Arbaz.When the police questioned Tousif further, they found that his nephew Arbaz had met with an accident on May 4, 2019. Arbaz had been riding a bike with his brother Aifaz (then 22) and a relative Moshin, when the accident took place.The family had rushed the trio to the local hospital, where Dharmakare was the on-duty doctor. The family alleged that due to negligence on the part of the doctor, Arbaaz lost his life. The family even had a fight with Dharmakare and they allegedly threatened that he would have to pay for his actions. Bhujbal said that during the police investigation, they found that for the past two years, the family had been looking for an opportunity to get back at Dharmakare. They had kept an eye on his movements even earlier this year, following which they decided to allegedly kill him last Tuesday. It was Arbaz’s elder brother Aifaz who allegedly fired at the doctor and fled from the spot on the bike.

Are we a lawless society? More problematic is the government apathy and silence of human right commission. Here comes the point that what is the role of our doctor’s organizations, human right organizations, parent hospitals and institutes.

   Good Governance lies in prevention of such incidents. Knee-jerk policing activities after every incident are of limited benefit.   Moreover  the  impunity with which people  dare to take law into their hands and  tend to punish doctors instantly for perceived negligence,  is a blatant disrespect to courts and judicial system.

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

     REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

     21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

     Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

US Doctor hailed-Indian Doctor Jailed for Same Surgery & gap of 25 years


      

In a medical first, doctors transplanted a pig heart into a patient in a last-ditch effort to save his life and a Maryland hospital said Monday that he’s doing well three days after the highly experimental surgery. While it’s too soon to know if the operation really will work, it marks a step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants.

   In 1997, Dr Dhani Ram Baruah, along with Hong Kong surgeon Dr Jonathan Ho Kei-Shing, carried out a pig-to-human heart and lung transplant in Guwahati (India). The transplant stirred controversy all over and both the doctors were arrested within a fortnight for culpable homicide and under the Transplantation of Human Organs Act, 1994, and imprisoned for 40 days.

       The fault of Dr Baruah was that he was on the wrong side of the laws prevailing at that time. But now after 25 years USA has provided evidence that he was scientifically ahead of his times; hence punished and sent to jail for the same reason.  Instead of updating the laws, accepting and promoting the scientific advancement and encouraging the brilliance of the doctor, he was put in jail. The result is that now everyone is hailing the feat of doctors in USA for the same surgery that Dr Baruah dared to perform 25 years ago.

        In a patient with terminal  heart  failure, life is  only possible if heart transplant is done. Human heart is difficult to be procured.

     The point to ponder is that whether Laws should be made or may be updated to promote or help scientific brilliance or it is wise to follow them blindly without application to  future wisdom. Instead of punishing and sending Dr Baruah to jail, Laws could have been modified or updated to help the path breaking advancement, which could have helped patients and saved lives.

       Such high handedness of authorities just point to an ecosystem, where scientific advancements and individual brilliance  are not respected.

       As doctors in the United States hail the path-breaking surgery in which a patient is recovering after receiving a heart from a genetically modified pig in Maryland, it evokes memories of an Indian doctor who had attempted the same over 20 years ago in Assam.

For those who haven’t read, US doctors transplanted a pig heart into David Bennett, a 57-year-old Maryland handyman, in a last-ditch effort to save his life and a Maryland hospital said that he’s doing well three days after the highly experimental surgery.

We go back in time to take a look at the case in which Dr Dhani Ram Baruah, a transplant surgeon from Assam conducted a pig-to-human heart and lung transplant in Guwahati and why that incident got shrouded in controversy and led to him being imprisoned for 40 days.

The incident                                                   

In 1997, Dr Dhani Ram Baruah, along with Hong Kong surgeon Dr Jonathan Ho Kei-Shing, carried out a pig-to-human heart and lung transplant in Guwahati.

Times of India report says that Dr Baruah transplanted a pig’s heart into a 32-year-old man, who had a ventricular septal defect, or hole in the heart.

According to Dr Baruah, the surgery — conducted at his very own facility, the Dhani Ram Baruah Heart Institute, and Institute of Applied Human Genetic Engineering at Sonapur outside Guwahati — was completed in 15 hours.

However, the 32-year-old man “developed new anti-hyperacute rejection biochemical solution to treat donor’s heart and lung and blind its immune system to avoid rejection”, reported the Indian Express, and he died a week later.

The transplant stirred controversy all over and both the doctors were arrested within a fortnight for culpable homicide and under the Transplantation of Human Organs Act, 1994, and imprisoned for 40 days.

The Assam government formed an inquiry into the case and found that the procedure was unethical.

The inquiry also found that the Dr Dhaniram Heart Institute and Research Centre had “neither applied for nor obtained registration” as required under the transplant laws.

What happened next?

After being in jail for 40 days, the doctor returned to his clinic but found it to be destroyed. A Times of India report added that he spent the next 18 months under virtual house arrest.

But, the doctor, who faced taunts, continued his research.

Controversy’s child?

Dr Baruah hit the headlines again in 2008 when he claimed that he had developed a ‘genetically engineered’ vaccine that would correct congenital heart defects.

In 2015, he once again became popular after claiming to have discovered the ‘cure’ for HIV/AIDS and that he had ‘cured’ 86 people in the past seven-eight years.

He also wrote to the UNAIDS, WHO and the National Institute of Health of USA to tell them of his ‘successes’ and was open to scrutiny.

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

     REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

     21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

     Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

NEET-PG-Counselling: A larger public emergency issue due to Pandemic


        NEET PG Post-Graduation after MBBS is an entrance qualification exam, one of toughest and important exam not only for medical students but for medical colleges and hospitals. As this exam will decide and form the back bone of the health care system in the whole country. Ultimately this exam will be the check gate to supply specialist doctors to medical colleges, hospitals and private health institutions in all the states.  Post graduate trainees form the bulk load of doctors performing the duties.  Needless to say these doctors form the back bone of the total health system across the country. For last two years, these junior doctors were at the forefront of the fighting the pandemic. 

       Since NEET PG was to be conducted in Jan 2021, but due to pandemic got postponed to Sept 2021 and result were declared few months back.

      NEET PG counselling is not only issue for doctors but an actually a larger public health issue and kind of emergency due to pandemic, which will decide the availability of doctors to public.

         Actually it is in patient’s interest to have early counselling.

         It is a sad situation, when the world is preparing to tackle the wave of pandemic due to Omicron Variant, other countries are ramping up their health care infrastructure and manpower, and Indian doctors are being dragged on roads by police instead of employing them in hospitals.

       Its importance assumes an emergency situation in face of looming pandemic. If the administrators had perceived it as merely a trivial doctors’ issue and remained complacent, it had been a grave mistake.

     What was the emergency to change and frame new rules when a pandemic of such a large proportion was going on?

    A delay in academic counselling means a wasted year for the NEET PG aspirants. It also means that 50000 doctors are missing from the medical system and  the health care force because of bureaucratic delays, at a time when health care staff is overworked and in desperate need of more hands.

      Point to ponder here is that is it the doctors who desperately need help? More precisely and in reality it is the patients and public who need doctors desperately. An early counselling is in public interest actually, the point administrators have failed to understand.

       But sadly, it is up to the wisdom of administrators that decides “what is emergency and what is not” rather than medical wisdom, a case of misplaced priorities.

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Want to be a Doctor: Expect No Justice


           

        Medical students or aspiring doctors should be carefully watching the behaviour and cruelty by which doctors are governed, regulated and treated by administrators. Mere few words of respect and false lip service during Covid-pandemic  should not mask the real face of administrators, indifference of courts and harshness of Government towards medical profession. Choosing medical careers can land anyone into the situations, which are unimaginable in a civilized world.

At a time when Political groups, terrorists, drug addicts, celebrities commit crimes and get a priority hearing by courts and speedy relief (whether deserve or not worthy), doctors pleadings even for their rightful issues and routine problems are paid deaf and indifferent ears. It is disheartening to see that they receive apathetic attitude and dealt with stick or false assurances even for the issues which should have been solved automatically in routine even by average application of governance.

             It is discouraging for the whole medical fraternity to see that even the rightful is not being given what to expect the gratitude and respect.

          The barbaric response of Police towards peacefully demanding doctors has unmasked the real indifferent attitude of Government and administrators as well as apathy of courts towards medical profession. The cruel behaviour has also unveiled the approach of  tokenism such as ‘mere lip service’  showing respect to corona warriors.

      The strong political and legal will is absent to solve Doctors’ problems.

      It also shows the scant  concern of the Government to provide a real good health care system despite showing a verbal concern for medical services. It also explains why successive Governments irrespective of political moorings  have terribly failed to provide healthcare to its people.  Why patients fail to get a bed, oxygen, doctors or nurse is consequence to the misplaced priorities of administrators.

    Who would be the worst sufferer of the apathetic attitude of the Government? Doctors will suffer initially till they continue to choose medical profession. Once they also become apathetic like administrators, it would be the patients.

Delhi: AIIMS, FAIMA doctors join protest after police crackdown

A day after resident doctors protesting delays in NEET-PG counselling alleged that they were assaulted by the police, doctors from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) as well as those associated with the Federation of All India Medical Association (FAIMA) have decided to join the stir.

Doctors from AIIMS, one of the only big tertiary-care government medical college hospitals that had stayed away from the protest, in a letter to the Union health minister, said that they would withdraw from all non-emergency work on Tuesday if no concrete steps are taken.

“It’s high time for the government to release a report of what has been done till date, and what are the government’s plans moving forward for expediting NEET-PG counselling. If no adequate response from the government is received within 24 hours, AIIMS RDA shall proceed with a token strike on 29/12/21 including shutdown of all non-emergency services,” the letter read.

This would hamper patient care in the city further. With emergency departments of big hospitals like Safdarjung and Lok Nayak affected by the strike, patients were being referred to the AIIMS for treatment.

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In addition, FAIMA called for its resident doctors’ association to withdraw from all work, including emergency services, after Monday’s incident. The protest began with withdrawal from outpatient department (OPD) services in November end by two national organisations – the Federation of Resident Doctors’ Association (FORDA) and FAIMA.

The protest slowly intensified with doctors boycotting even emergency work, following which on the insistence of the government the strike was paused for one week.

The strike resumed on December 17 as FORDA members withdrew from all services.

     Advantages-Disadvantage of being a doctor

     25 factors- why health care is expensive

     REEL Heroes Vs Real Heroes

     21 occupational risks to doctors and nurses

     Covid paradox: salary cut for doctors other paid at home

   Medical-Consumer protection Act- Pros and Cons

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