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Medical Regulation:Is it time to regulate medical business/ administrators of healthcare? “Oxygen cut, 30 children die in Gorakhpur hospital” who is responsible?


The inconsolable   catastrophic calamity in Gorakhpur Hospital is a mishap, which should be  preventable by good medical governance.   This is a real life example of negligence by poorly managed system, which has resulted in loss of multiple lives. Poor competence of administrators is more damaging, less containable, more damaging institutionally than smaller unintentional human errors by doctors. More than sadness, it is a painful surprise that such things can happen in present era of mammoth advancements! Until now, discussion on every such incidence stopped with blame on doctors in the end. No body will even try to look beyond doctor’s faults as it is easier to find some mistake or the other by retrospective analysis in doctor’s work or documents. That helps in cover up of system faults. Since ultimately it is only the doctor who is visible with the patient, doctor has to bear onus of each medical or non medical problems of health system. In routine circumstances, after the unanticipated death, one or two doctors  are made scapegoat, thrashed or harassed, unless proved innocent few years on, that also if they are lucky enough to have impartial investigation. Doctors carry the burden of universal expectations, thanklessness, threats and vandalism for bad outcomes, even in absence of proper health facilities. That is how, rest of medical industry, administrator  and non doctors associated with the health care,  mainly responsible for the problems,  enjoy   strange kind of immunity. But since now problems are overflowing  and big enough to unmask the real hidden people responsible for poor health care system in case an impartial inquiry is done.  Is it time to regulate all people including non doctors and medical businesses who are associated with health sector, in the manner doctors are regulated?

Oxygen cut, 30 children die in Gorakhpur hospital. Criminal negligence, row over unpaid bills hit encephalitis, neonatal wards.( Hindustan times)

 

Foremost admission is that we do not have a proper foolproof health care system. Strangely, the perpetual inadequacy of state healthcare infrastructure is never questioned.  Problems of electricity, oxygen, quality of drugs, medicine, quality of consumables, heath insurance implants and stents have very important role to play in treatment of the patient and cost associated with it. Doctors need essential items and can not work without  drugs and equipment , which are supplied by industry and procured by administrators.  Marketing, sales, pricing, insurance, quality  and all business deals  of these items are  beyond doctors preview. Therefore the  actual number of  non doctors  involved in health sector are beyond any imagination and these people  are not regulated in any manner. Ultimate blame is wrapped up by incriminating whole community of doctors, resulting  in misguided  conclusions. All these complex issues ends up with society inflicting a mode of self harm by mistrusting their savior.  In fact, there has been an article feeling a need for regulation of NHS managers, in a way same as doctors.

NHS Managers should face same regulation as doctors, says Francis

https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j2055 ( 25 April 2017)

Possibly it is time to unmask   and unveil the whole mammoth industry and regulate each and every person associated with health, in a manner same as doctors.  Role of non doctors , touts, different streams of medicine, administrators,  sales and marketing , medical  finance,  electricity, oxygen, cost and  quality medicine, drugs, consumables, implants and stents has very important   role to play and doctors should not be   burdened  with criticism for  all the mess created by all other people. Good health care system should be designed to prevent tragedies. Strict action after the event is just finding scapegoats.

Future medicine is beyond human limits: robots as doctor, till then human docs with robot like activity:


 

         The adage “To err is human” probably does not apply to the doctors. Doctors are definitely regarded different from rest of the humans and are not supposed to have privileges that other persons of humankind are guaranteed. Hence they are harassed often for any adverse clinical outcome even though it may be because of poor prognosis of patient. They work under continuous fear and stress and are punished for each small or big error. Then what are they? Modern slaves or human docs with robot like activity?

With advances in medical science, simultaneously there has been aberrant evolution of medical profession, education, regulation and medical industry. By provoking controversy about doctors for varied reasons, medical industry and law has intruded between the doctor patient relationship to take a centrestage in health care. Till now, doctor patient interaction was the central point of the health industry, a core around which medical industry revolved. Except this interaction, rest almost everything is controlled by industry.  If this interaction too is replaced by robotic machines, the control of medical industry over business of health will be almost complete. With the evolution of robotic technology and artificial intelligence, the dream of industry to have full control over health care business has become a realistic possibility.  There have been technical advancements to promote better treatment and diagnosis but these, at the same time, increase the cost of treatment and involvement and hence dependence on investors and industry. Complexity of medical science, industry, legalities and medical regulation has been multiplying everyday beyond human limits for doctors, at least in some specialties. Long years of training, Dealing and working with all complexities of medical system, all time retrospective analysis of their work by patients and lawyers, complex documentations, social media mudslinging, extensive and complex communication, technical advancements and legal interactions has taken a toll on the doctors and they are gradually ceasing to be normal human beings. They are slowly being converted to humans with robot like activity.

Also there is a thought whether doctors can be replaced by robots, completely or partly. Such talk of having machines is not without basis as all the stakeholders are feeling the need for a drastic change to have better and better medical care .

 

Future of medical profession: Robots as doctor:

  1. Usually doctors have to carry huge burden of expectation of society and patient. People want quick and effective treatment, without human faults, with an up-to-date medical knowledge delivered within moments. Unrealistic expectations are getting beyond human limits and these can be fulfilled only by robots.
  2. Since well trained doctors are lesser in number, they are expected to deliver a curative treatment with excellent accuracy with perfect documentation even when load of patients is extraordinarily high.
  3. Even in presence of extraordinary work load and difficult circumstances, doctor are supposed to maintain perfect documentation to save himself. Because later, any case can be subjected to legal scrutiny in future. Lawyers and courts will analyze retrospectively for years, with wisdom of hindsight and luxury of time, to find the faults and may punish the savior.
  4. Nobody wants to die. Even somebody with severe disease, with poor prognosis, have tendency to blame doctors for his illness, if he has contacted    Such incidences occurring too frequently cause feeling of hurt to doctors. Verbal and physical assaults is a routine. Robots will be immune to such painful thoughts and will not be affected mentally and continue to work perfectly in such circumstances.
  1. Training to be a Doctors are expensive and takes years. It takes painful long years and time. Human life span is limited. Therefore training a doctor and paying him life long, a bad business idea for industry and society. That is reason of unwillingness to pay even the rightful to the doctors. Robots will be a onetime investment. Life is one and span is less. Studies and gaining experience takes away good part of doctor’s life.  People from strong financial backgrounds avoid becoming doctors. Although they may opt for becoming health managers or investors.
  1. Human limitations, like tiredness, mood variation, feeling hurt, family issues, failure to apologize always in all situations (especially if doctor is not at fault), diagnostic  bias, limited knowledge   are various human factors with doctors, which are undesirable  for being a doctor and can be rectified easily with Robots.
  1. Available medical information is like a sea, that cannot be held in a hand. However brilliant doctor may be, he will know fraction of available knowledge. The moment we pass our exams, we start becoming out of date.
  2. Human bias always plays a role, because medical science is far from complete. Moreover rapid change in technology makes all knowledge and experience of a doctor redundant. Robots can be easily updated.

 Present medicine: human docs with Robot like activity:

As humans, doctors can make errors, get demoralized or dragged to courts or subjected to verbal or physical abuse, their mood and enthusiasm may be spoiled and may make more errors in other patients as well.  But they have to continue to perform as due to nature of their work does not allow them to have time to cool their mind. Repeated incidents make doctors immune to such mudslinging. Their reaction to these insults and distressing situations becomes blunt and reactions are subdued like that of a Robot.  Doctors themselves are slowly being converted to Robots like creatures.

  • Doctors do not react to unjustified verbal assaults of a patient, same as machine do.
  • They do not get demoralized easily because of moral assassination by media, calling them thieves, thugs and dacoits, even doing most helpful job in the entire society, saving lives. Now there is no reaction from doctors, when an uncommon or single stray incidence of adverse kind is used to portray all doctors in same light. This unwavering sanity looks like as if there have no apperception to perception of such poignant thoughts, same as Robots.
  • Many of them tirelessly work day and night without rest and food, along with verbal and physical assaults, accomplish arduous tasks like a machine.
  • Medicine is very complex and far from complete, still the precision executed by this wonderful community is no less than great machine “robot”. They executing all theory, practical and experience, application with in a trice. There personal emotions get a machine like toughness. They look like tough ship in such tornado, like a tough machine with no human weakness.
  • There is many things going in a doctor’s life, on professional and personal front. For example, care of sick, difficult family communication, perfect documentation, complaints, ongoing, court cases, declaring deaths, data maintenance, treatment and prevention of infections, nosocomial infections, medico legal suits, iatrogenic complications or simply genuine poor prognostic patients, unforeseen complications, unnecessary mudslinging by media and social media along with newer advances to cope with. There can be personal and own family issues as well. For a simple human being, it is difficult to accomplish all this complexities   immaculately and at the same time, while handling the ongoing patient load.
  • Doctors continue to work unaffected by continuous retrospective analysis and afflictive comments from practically every side, patients, administration and courts. All of them acquire wisdom off hindsight and have luxury of time to make an analysis.

 

Present and Future of medical profession:

Robots will be immune from errors and mood swings, tiredness and human limitations, hurt feelings, (will apologize always even if it is not their fault). And therefore legalities in the profession will be minimized.  No breach of protocol is possible. No questions or room for mistrust. Robots can do duties all seven days a week and 365 days a year. Public, Governments and medical industry will be happy. With Artificial intelligence and rapid advancement in robotics, doctors will have very little role in medical industry. Best part is that, it will be a onetime investment.

 

          Minor disadvantage:  Only things Robots lack human touch and feelings and will not be going extra mile for patient as compared to human doctors. Robots will just complete protocols. But with time, these   qualities will not be required anymore. There will be no humans to blame for the suffering of diseased, or to vent anger at. No human scapegoat will be there for physical or legal revenge. But till the time human doctors are   completely replaced by machine robots, ordinary mortals have to fill in and they will be human Docs with robots like activity (HUDOROLA).

Hyderabad’s Osmania hospital women doctor’s assault: Uncivilized society and irresponsible administration


Does this happen in any profession, while doing normal work, a female staff is assaulted  by mobs and no action is taken by a civilized society and a responsible government. 

Another shameful incidence in Hyderabad, where women doctors were beaten by mobs should have shaken the civilized society or any responsible administration and government. But in such chaotic environment, it does not make a news of importance to people, who matter and are responsible for controlling such uncivilized actions.

https://www.timesdelhi.com/2017/07/31/hyderabads-osmania-hospital-doctors-go-on-strike-over-violence-against-colleagues/ 

It is not just women rights commission, the silence of women activists, socialites etc, who cry hoarse for women rights, is perplexing. These organizations and individuals have been silent all along since the women being assaulted are “doctors”. No dharna, no protest or statement of condemn. Is that the situation that doctors are not having rights of normal human beings. 

Nearly 250 junior doctors and house surgeons have been boycotting their duties except for emergency services since Sunday night, demanding security for them and action against those involved in the attack. The strike by medicos hit services at OGH, one of the oldest hospitals in the country and the biggest government-run facility in Telangana.

Four attendants of a woman patient, who died during the treatment, assaulted two female junior doctors and a duty doctor on Sunday night, when The 70-year-old patient, who was in critical condition, died at Intensive Care Unit. Alleging that she died due to negligence by doctors, four of her relatives barged into the ICU and attacked them. It said this was the fourth incident at OGH in one month.

Lot of people including our respected leaders and some great actors talk in media about this slogan and pretend to do a lot about saving and educating our daughters. While on the other hand, those fathers who made their daughter a doctor and truly did the society proud are anguished. Their daughters have been assaulted by mobs just because they were doctors. This has bared the hypocrisy prevailing in our society .Why none of the politicians or actors, both male and female, have not taken a stand for this cause openly?  My humble request to them is to do more than mere sloganeering and tokenism,  just  show that  you really mean, what you say.

Beti Bachao Beti Padhao vs assault of female doctors: silence of leaders and great actors: need more than sloganeering and tokenism

Women doctor assault- – time worse than MAHABHARTA for women doctors

Cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by doctor: Match between life and death: more gripping than cricket match:


 

                  A young man in mid  twenties was wheeled in  to intensive care. He was unable to breathe and his oxygen levels and blood pressure was falling within moments. Within no time he became unconscious following which CPR was started along with other supportive measures. Echocardiography was managed meanwhile was suggestive of pulmonary embolism. CPR was continued and simultaneously, thrombolytic drugs were pushed in. His pulse kept on coming and vanishing with monitors sometimes showing activity of heart and improved oxygen levels. A team of around nine doctors and nurses was taking care of airway, central and other lines. There was almost an orchestrated movement of staff with drugs being administered with superfast speed. Commands being given by the treating doctor were followed in split seconds. In the same trice, the team leader had to think far ahead about how he would be handling the challenging dynamics of that young human life who was almost at its fag end.  He had to recognize, analyze and mitigate the situation within few seconds.   He had to make split decisions and still had to be flexible with his decision and plans, altering them according to the responsiveness of the patient.  Doing every bit in an electrifying instant, he had put in all his energy and experience to full use in those few seconds essential to save the young life. After around 35-40 minutes of high adrenaline rush time, the efforts paid off and silent   smiles on faces of  the team indicated that tornado had become manageable. The doctors and nurses, with sweat on foreheads, smiled quietly with mutual admiration. There was no clapping or cheering in this match of life and death to which the doctors and nurses are well accustomed.  There were no spectators to encourage the team. The return of a robust pulse is all the cheering this team needed. There was no one to witness and applaud the zeal and anxiety of these performers, not even patient himself.

                     Incidents such as one described above are common occurrences in medical practice. It takes a lot of inner mental as well as physical strength besides emotional resilience to tide through such situations. Even relatives, when required, are not able to sustain the adrenergic drive required at these times.

                      Unlike the case above, the result may not be favorable in certain cases. It is not uncommon for relatives, to then question and start sparring match with doctors and nurses in case they fail in their brave attempt. Often even in successful resuscitations, questions are asked in preposterous manner about the incident. Doctors and nurses may even be verbally and physically abused if they fail despite their best efforts. Relatives can be vengeful and drag them to court to harass and punish them. Common assertion about the wrong injection is almost universal, even in most difficult scenarios. Courts and lawyers, deliberating over years with luxury of time, may find something or other to punish the savior, by doing retrospective analysis or by the wisdom of hindsight. Even if court rules after years that the doctor was right, revenge of patient’ relatives, monetary benefit to lawyers and harassment of doctor, both mentally and emotionally is complete. But they still carry on their noble job and though pained by these issues, doctor will just go to another bed and see what he can do for another patient. This cycle continues, every minute, day and night, all year round. Thousands get gift of life every minute by this wonderful community of doctors and nurses, irrespective of injury inflicted on them.                                                                         

                   After the abovementioned incident of successful CPR, I just went to doctor’s room to have tea and a cricket match was going on, streamed live on TV. On the screen, thousands of people were seen clapping and cheering the player who was swinging his arm ready to throw the ball and also the batsman. But to me, the adrenergic rush here was no match to what I had just experienced in the ICU. The cricket match was merely a trifling entertainment with a futile outcome. Every day in each hospital, there are one or more magnificent matches of life and death played without any spectators. Many a times our players (doctors and nurses) win and thousands of lives are salvaged back from brink of death. These extraordinary matches finish with just quiet smiles. There is no one to clap or cheer and no recognition or prizes to the player for winning these match of life and death. Few good patients and relatives, who do realize the magnitude of the act offer heartfelt thanks. The respect, trust and support of the relatives at such times is all that a doctor needs to rev up for his next case, a real match in true sense. In comparison to this frantic match of life and death, rest of all matches are insensate. 

Suicide by medical student : Global, world wide Rotten system of medical education


A Resident doctor student of Surgery at GMC  Surat allegedly committed suicide last week by jumping from ninth floor. He blamed work pressure and torture in his suicide note. Actions and conversations are generated only after some terrifying incident and finish with making few scapegoats to blame for  one, like five seniors doctors in this case. But the whole system continues to function in same      inhuman way.  This rotten system ignores the deleterious culture of medicine and dangerous working conditions to which junior doctors are subjected.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/surat/5-booked-for-abetting-suicide-of-gmc-doctor/articleshow/59463184.cms

Medical students enter medicine as inspired, intelligent, compassionate humanitarians. Soon they turn into cynical and exhausted humans. How did all these totally amazing and high-functioning people get so disillusioned so fast?

Problem does pertain to doctors all over the world, as evidenced by suicide by Dr Chloe Abbott in Australia in January. Her sister Micaela said she was Eaten Alive by the medical profession.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4325812/Investigation-medical-profession-suicide-epidemic.html

 

Inhuman duties, neglect, apathy of regulators towards genuine problems, chaotic  system of working have left doctors, specially in residencies vulnerable to mental illness. Sometimes even driving them to suicides  because of  system failures of medical  administration and inaction by Government.

The terrible conditions have engulfed not only junior phase of doctors, but continue for longer period of their lives, for most of doctors. Because medical professionals find themselves  at the wrong end of stick of government, courts, media for brutal expectations. They face public wrath for system failure.  There is an urgent need for change in work culture and regulations, to make conditions safe for doctors. Grueling shifts, inhuman working hours have to end now, if society really wants to be treated by good doctors.

 

Untenable working conditions, long inhuman hours, unrealistic expectations of patients and thereby creating pressure situations, fear of complaints, physical assaults and medical lawsuits have killed profession largely. Bullying and harassment from all possible quarters is unavoidable consequence.

My earlier article “ enslavement of medical profession” highlights the plight of doctors.

  Almost every doctor will have horror stories to tell, about working conditions. For which medical regulators should be ashamed, there is nothing to be proud of.

      

Ancient Medicine: Introduction of woman as nurses and doctors


 

Introduction of Woman Nurses and Doctors in 19th century Modern medicine 

Women as physicians

It was very difficult for women to become doctors in any field before the 1970s. Elizabeth Blackwell (1821–1910) became the first woman to formally study and practice medicine in the United States. She was a leader in women’s medical education. While Blackwell viewed medicine as a means for social and moral reform, her student Mary Putnam Jacobi (1842–1906) focused on curing disease. At a deeper level of disagreement, Blackwell felt that women would succeed in medicine because of their humane female values, but Jacobi believed that women should participate as the equals of men in all medical specialties using identical methods, values and insights. In the Soviet Union although the majority of medical doctors were women, they were paid less than the mostly male factory workers.

Women as nurses

Florence Nightingale triggered the professionalization of nursing.

Women had always served in ancillary roles, and as midwives and healers. The professionalization of medicine forced them increasingly to the sidelines. As hospitals multiplied they relied in Europe on orders of Roman Catholic nun-nurses, and German Protestant and Anglican deaconesses in the early 19th century. They were trained in traditional methods of physical care that involved little knowledge of medicine. The breakthrough to professionalization based on knowledge of advanced medicine was led by Florence Nightingale in England. She resolved to provide more advanced training than she saw on the Continent. Britain’s male doctors preferred the old system, but Nightingale won out and her Nightingale Training School opened in 1860 and became a model. The Nightingale solution depended on the patronage of upper class women, and they proved eager to serve. Royalty became involved. In 1902 the wife of the British king took control of the nursing unit of the British army, became its president, and renamed it after herself as the Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps, when she died the next queen became president.

           In the United States, upper middle class women who already supported hospitals promoted nursing. The new profession proved highly attractive to women of all backgrounds, and schools of nursing opened in the late 19th century. They soon a function of large hospitals, where they provided a steady stream of low-paid idealistic workers. The International Red Cross began operations in numerous countries in the late 19th century, promoting nursing as an ideal profession for middle class women.

The Nightingale model was widely copied. Linda Richards (1841 – 1930) studied in London and became the first professionally trained American nurse. She established nursing training programs in the United States and Japan, and created the first system for keeping individual medical records for hospitalized patients. The Russian Orthodox Church sponsored seven orders of nursing sisters in the late 19th century. They ran hospitals, clinics, almshouses, pharmacies, and shelters as well as training schools for nurses. In the Soviet era (1917–1991), with the aristocratic sponsors gone, nursing became a low-prestige occupation based in poorly maintained hospitals.

 

Woman : Renaissance to Early Modern period 16th-18th century

Catholic women played large roles in health and healing in medieval and early modern Europe. A life as a nun was a prestigious role. Wealthy families provided dowries for their daughters, and these funded the convents, while the nuns provided free nursing care for the poor.

The Catholic elites provided hospital services because of their theology of salvation that good works were the route to heaven. The Protestant reformers rejected the notion that rich men could gain God’s grace through good works, and thereby escape purgatory, by providing cash endowments to charitable institutions. They also rejected the Catholic idea that the poor patients earned grace and salvation through their suffering.  Protestants generally closed all the convents and most of the hospitals, sending women home to become housewives, often against their will. On the other hand, local officials recognized the public value of hospitals, and some were continued in Protestant lands, but without monks or nuns and in the control of local governments.

In London, the crown allowed two hospitals to continue their charitable work, under nonreligious control of city officials. The convents were all shut down but Harkness finds that women, some of them former nuns, were part of a new system that delivered essential medical services to people outside their family. They were employed by parishes and hospitals, as well as by private families, and provided nursing care as well as some medical, pharmaceutical, and surgical services.

Meanwhile, in Catholic lands such as France, rich families continued to fund convents and monasteries, and enrolled their daughters as nuns who provided free health services to the poor. Nursing was a religious role for the nurse, and there was little call for science. 

 

 

 

        Permanent link: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=History_of_medicine&oldid=783167827

            Link    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_medicine

National Doctor’s Day: India, USA


India

Also celebrated on July 1 all across India to honor the legendary physician and the second Chief Minister of West Bengal, Dr Bidhan Chandra Roy. He was born on July 1, 1882 and died on the same date in 1962, aged 80 years. Dr Roy was honored with the country’s highest civilian award, Bharat Ratna on February 4, 1961. The Doctor’s Day is observed today to lay emphasis on the value of doctors in our lives. It is an occasion to give them their due respect through commemorating one of their greatest representatives. India has shown remarkable improvements in the medical field and July 1 pays a perfect tribute to all the doctors who have made relentless efforts towards achieving this goal irrespective of the odds.

 

United States

In the United States, National Doctors’ Day is a day on which the service of physicians to the nation is recognized annually. The idea came from Eudora Brown Almond, wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond, and the date chosen was the anniversary of the first use of general anesthesia in surgery. On March 30, 1842, in Jefferson, Georgia, Dr Crawford Long used ether used to anesthetize a patient, James Venable, and painlessly excised a tumor from his neck.

The first Doctors’ Day observance was March 30th, 1933, in Winder, Georgia. This first observance included the mailing of cards to the physicians and their wives, flowers placed on graves of deceased doctors, including Dr. Long, and a formal dinner in the home of Dr. and Mrs. William T. Randolph. After the Barrow County Alliance adopted Mrs. Almond’s resolution to pay tribute to the doctors, the plan was presented to the Georgia State Medical Alliance in 1933 by Mrs. E. R. Harris of Winder, president of the Barrow County Alliance. On May 10, 1934, the resolution was adopted at the annual state meeting in Augusta, Georgia. The resolution was introduced to the Women’s Alliance of the Southern Medical Association at its 29th annual meeting held in St. Louis, Missouri, November 19-22, 1935, by the Alliance president, Mrs. J. Bonar White. Since then, Doctors’ Day has become an integral part of and synonymous with, the Southern Medical Association Alliance. Through the years, the red carnation has been used as the symbol of Doctors’ Day.

 

Permanent link: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=National_Doctors%27_Day&oldid=785811878

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Doctors%27_Day

India

Also celebrated on July 1 all across India to honor the legendary physician and the second Chief Minister of West Bengal, Dr Bidhan Chandra Roy. He was born on July 1, 1882 and died on the same date in 1962, aged 80 years. Dr Roy was honored with the country’s highest civilian award, Bharat Ratna on February 4, 1961. The Doctor’s Day is observed today to lay emphasis on the value of doctors in our lives. It is an occasion to give them their due respect through commemorating one of their greatest representatives. India has shown remarkable improvements in the medical field and July 1 pays a perfect tribute to all the doctors who have made relentless efforts towards achieving this goal irrespective of the odds.

But in recent times, sadly “ Happy Doctor’s Day” is just a Tokenism, a hollow slogan”.

United States

In the United States, National Doctors’ Day is a day on which the service of physicians to the nation is recognized annually. The idea came from Eudora Brown Almond, wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond, and the date chosen was the anniversary of the first use of general anesthesia in surgery. On March 30, 1842, in Jefferson, Georgia, Dr Crawford Long used ether used to anesthetize a patient, James Venable, and painlessly excised a tumor from his neck.

The first Doctors’ Day observance was March 30th, 1933, in Winder, Georgia. This first observance included the mailing of cards to the physicians and their wives, flowers placed on graves of deceased doctors, including Dr. Long, and a formal dinner in the home of Dr. and Mrs. William T. Randolph. After the Barrow County Alliance adopted Mrs. Almond’s resolution to pay tribute to the doctors, the plan was presented to the Georgia State Medical Alliance in 1933 by Mrs. E. R. Harris of Winder, president of the Barrow County Alliance. On May 10, 1934, the resolution was adopted at the annual state meeting in Augusta, Georgia. The resolution was introduced to the Women’s Alliance of the Southern Medical Association at its 29th annual meeting held in St. Louis, Missouri, November 19-22, 1935, by the Alliance president, Mrs. J. Bonar White. Since then, Doctors’ Day has become an integral part of and synonymous with, the Southern Medical Association Alliance. Through the years, the red carnation has been used as the symbol of Doctors’ Day.

 

 

Permanent link: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=National_Doctors%27_Day&oldid=785811878

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Doctors%27_Day

 

 

Happy doctors day:  merely a hollow slogan?


On 1st of July, doctors are usually greeted from multiple quarters. Newspapers, media and some prominent people  congratulate doctors in their speeches or on their social media pages. However, what doctors need are not just verbal wishes but reinforcement of public’s belief in them . It is this renewal of faith in their saviour which will help  doctors in discharging their duties smoothly and in alleviating their problems.

National Doctor’s Day: India, USA

Despite the paucity of the highly trained medical professionals, the identity of medical professionals as a community in society is not getting its due right  because of  misplaced priorities of  certain people. The society tries to impose a stereotype role on them in an effort to control them fully. And as a result of these various controls, regulations and public pressure, doctors experience unrealistic performance pressure on professional front.

     Doctor is the pivot  point between patients, medical industry, government and insurance sector. Huge number of patients, expensive medicines, poor medical infrastructure has produced tremendous resentment against medical system amongst public. But the brunt of this entire angst has to be borne by the doctor or medical professionals alone. Often they are blamed for circumstances beyond their control and punished for system failure. Fear of public wrath and lawsuits is smothering the medical profession.  And increasingly there is a feeling amongst medical professionals that they are getting a raw deal despite doing their very best.

     In such a situation, there should be some introspection by all stakeholders every year, on doctor’s day. The doctor’s day should be more than just greetings and wishes for doctors. Some real resolutions need to be  taken so that their working atmosphere and eventually delivery of medical care is improved and this ultimately will benefit patients only.  I can think of some much needed changes-

1.       Government should take some concrete decision to improve medical  infrastructure and manpower. A better planning needs to be done to spend more for health of people, availability of resources and for improving the working conditions for doctors. Government should ensure that doctors are better protected.

2.       Medical industry should collectively think of protecting doctors or there should be provision for some financialresponsibility of medical lawsuits of all doctors.  Pharmacy industry, medical device industry, insurance industry  and others earn huge profits because doctors need to use their products. Although medical industry makes huge profits still they remain behind the scene.

3.       Police should provide  assured protection to  doctors better against physical violence.

4.       Medical education institutes should resolve to promote the education of best doctors and not indulge in profiteering in education of doctors.

5.       Courts should take an initiative to protect doctors against frivolous lawsuits ( which are often done to prevent paying their bills), revengeful attitude of patients  and harassment?

6.       On doctor’s day, public should resolve that they will not unnecessarily fight or abuse the doctor.

7.       And last but most important is that all medical practioners , be it allopathic, ayurvedic, unani, homoeopathic or others who play a role in maintaining health of patients, affirm that they will do everything to protect dignity and integrity of this profession.

If the above are not practised and followed, then mere sloganeering on doctor’s day  makes no sense . The  effort to improve training and working condition of doctors has to come from the bottom of the heart of all those involve, both giver and taker.  Mere tokenism on a day in a year is of no real purpose. If the present scenario continues, soon a common man will have problem in accessing good medical care which is currently available at nominal cost . One needs to ponder seriously, if we do not save doctors, who will save us? 

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